Updates on Endodontics

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 July 2024) | Viewed by 3822

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Emeritus Professor, Department of Endodontology, Goldschlager School of Dental Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
Interests: endodontics; cosmetic dentistry; dental education; periodontology; orthodontics; pediatric dentistry; oral pathology; regenerative endodontics; pulp biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The field of endodontics has undergone significant changes in the last two decades, facilitating a better understanding of the dentin-pulp physiology, pathology and microbiology. Particularly, the development of the endodontic microscope, which enable better illumination and magnification, allowed to fabricate more effective instruments and new techniques for root canal preparation. Additionally, the use of bioactive materials improved the methods of root canal filling, and the new imaging systems and software opened novel avenues for understanding and clarifying diagnosis. All of these led to the development of new treatment protocols for root canal preparation, root canal obturation and a complete set of new surgical endodontic techniques, along with an updated guideline for treating traumatized teeth.

Regenerative endodontic procedures, the newest approach to the biological treatment of immature necrotic teeth, turned out to be rather effective, showing nearly 100% success in periapical healing; periapical healing and continuation of root development by root elongation and dentin wall widening with signs of positive vitality signs. All these advancements led to increasing numbers of teeth saved by endodontic treatment thus improving the life quality. In this Special Issue, we welcome authors to submit papers providing invaluable insights into the world of advanced endodontics.       

Prof. Dr. Arieh Y. Kaufman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • calcium hydroxide
  • dental traumatology
  • endodontics
  • endodontic surgery
  • Instrumentation
  • obturation
  • regenerative endodontic treatment
  • root canal treatment

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 1712 KiB  
Article
Is a Pre-Existent Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Able to Detect Metal Dental Posts?
by Michael Solomonov, Avi Hadad, Joe Ben Itzhak, Alex Lvovsky and Hadas Azizi
Dent. J. 2024, 12(7), 229; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12070229 - 22 Jul 2024
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Abstract
(1) Background: In this study, the efficacy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in detecting dental posts was compared to periapical radiography. (2) Methods: A retrospective evaluation of 53 patients’ periapical radiographs and CBCT images was performed. The presence and type of the intra-canal [...] Read more.
(1) Background: In this study, the efficacy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in detecting dental posts was compared to periapical radiography. (2) Methods: A retrospective evaluation of 53 patients’ periapical radiographs and CBCT images was performed. The presence and type of the intra-canal dental post were initially determined on the periapical images (PA) radiographs’ examination and were then compared to the observer’s ability to detect the dental post on a CBCT image. The effect of the post’s type (metal cast or prefabricated) on its detection on CBCT images was determined. (3) Results: 10.5% of teeth that were identified as having a post on a PA radiograph were not identified as having a post on the CBCT examination (p < 0.05). Approximately 17.6% of teeth that were identified as not having a post on a PA radiograph were identified as having a post on the CBCT examination (p < 0.05). Moreover, 16.3% and 50% of teeth with a prefabricated or cast posts on PA radiographs were falsely identified on the CBCT examination, respectively (p < 0.05). (4) Conclusions: A CBCT image is an insufficient tool for the identification of metal prefabricated and cast posts. A PA image is the recommended radiographic tool for achieving information about the post-endodontic restoration status of teeth candidates for endodontic retreatment in patients with a former CBCT scan. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Updates on Endodontics)
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11 pages, 1135 KiB  
Article
Debris and Smear Layer Removal in Curved Root Canals: A Comparative Study of Ultrasonic and Sonic Irrigant Activation Techniques
by Ronald Wigler, Yara Srour, Yuval Wilchfort, Zvi Metzger and Anda Kfir
Dent. J. 2024, 12(3), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12030051 - 26 Feb 2024
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the cleaning efficacy of three irrigant activation devices with a control of non-activated syringe and needle irrigation in curved root canals. Sixty human curved roots were endodontically prepared and divided into four groups (n = [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to compare the cleaning efficacy of three irrigant activation devices with a control of non-activated syringe and needle irrigation in curved root canals. Sixty human curved roots were endodontically prepared and divided into four groups (n = 15) with similar root curvature distributions. Final irrigation using 4% NaOCl was performed with a syringe and needle (30-G) alone, or with Eddy sonic powered irrigation system (polymeric tip #0.25/0.06), Endosonic ultrasonic activation (polymeric tip #0.25/0.03), or Irrisafe ultrasonic activation (stainless-steel tip, #0.25/0.00). SEM was used to evaluate cleaning efficacy, employing five-score systems for debris and smear layer. While no significant difference in debris removal was observed between Endosonic or Irrisafe activation and non-activated irrigation, Eddy sonic powered irrigation system significantly improved debris removal in the apical third of curved root canals. Smear layer removal was effective in coronal and mid-root sections for all groups but less so in the apical third. Thus, Eddy sonic powered irrigation system demonstrated higher efficacy in removing debris from the apical third of curved root canals compared with non-activated syringe and needle irrigation. However, all three irrigant activation systems exhibited no difference from the non-activated control in smear layer removal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Updates on Endodontics)
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Review

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12 pages, 2575 KiB  
Review
Epoxy vs. Calcium Silicate-Based Root Canal Sealers for Different Clinical Scenarios: A Narrative Review
by Hadas Azizi, Avi Hadad, Dan Henry Levy, Joe Ben Itzhak, Hyeon-Cheol Kim and Michael Solomonov
Dent. J. 2024, 12(4), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj12040085 - 25 Mar 2024
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Abstract
This study aimed to review the considerations for choosing a suitable sealer according to various endodontic scenarios. An electronic search of PubMed, Scopus, and the Web of Science was undertaken for the keywords of ‘sealer choosing’, ‘appropriate sealer’, ‘suitable sealer’, ‘sealer for clinical [...] Read more.
This study aimed to review the considerations for choosing a suitable sealer according to various endodontic scenarios. An electronic search of PubMed, Scopus, and the Web of Science was undertaken for the keywords of ‘sealer choosing’, ‘appropriate sealer’, ‘suitable sealer’, ‘sealer for clinical scenario’, and ‘sealer for clinical situations’. However, the literature review revealed a lack of studies with practical clinical recommendations regarding the choice of appropriate endodontic root canal sealers for particular clinical situations of root canal treatment. Therefore, a narrative review was undertaken under the basis of the characteristics of an epoxy resin-based sealer (ERS) versus a calcium silicate-based sealer (CSS). Based on the evidence found through the review, the choice of an appropriate sealer in a variety of clinical scenarios was proposed. An ERS is recommended for one-visit non-vital cases, teeth with periodontal involvement, cracked teeth, and internal root resorption without root perforation. A CSS is recommended for vital or non-vital cases in multiple visits, teeth with internal root resorption with perforation or internal approach for external cervical resorption, teeth with open apices, and teeth with iatrogenic aberrations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Updates on Endodontics)
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