Advanced Nanotechnologies in Perovskite Solar Cells

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials for Energy Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 2697

Special Issue Editors

Advanced Materials & Electronics Laboratory, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Interests: renewable energy; solar conversion; hybrid materials; thin film electronics; perovskite solar cells; defect passivation
Department of Electronic and Information Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Interests: condensed matter physics; inorganic oxide; quantum dots; perovskite solar cells; electron transport materials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Photovoltaic technology directly converts solar energy into electricity, offering a clean and sustainable solution to overcome the challenge of the ever-increasing global energy demand. Over the past decade, solar cells based on organic–inorganic halide perovskites have emerged as one of the leading photovoltaic materials due to their unique and tunable optoelectronic properties, boosting the power conversion efficiencies of perovskite solar cells over 25% for laboratory-based devices (0.1 cm2) and ~20% for minimodules, which are comparable with or superior to the well-established photovoltaic technology.

Advanced nanomaterials and nanotechnologies play an important role as the light-harvesting materials, charge transport materials, and interface modification materials in perovskite solar cells. This Special Issue is aimed at advanced nanomaterials and nanotechnologies in perovskite solar cells, inviting papers on, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Nanostructured perovskite materials for light harvesting and energy conversion;
  • Synthesis of nanocomposites based on metal oxides as the interface materials for perovskite solar cells;
  • Perovskite solar cells processed by solution nanotechnology;
  • Carbon nanomaterials and supermolecules in perovskite solar cells.

Dr. Kuan Liu
Dr. Zhiwei Ren
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • perovskite solar cells
  • nanostructured
  • quantum dots
  • metal oxide
  • electron transport materials
  • defect passivation
  • carbon nanomaterials
  • supermolecule

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

19 pages, 4518 KiB  
Review
Recent Advances on the Strategies to Stabilize the α-Phase of Formamidinium Based Perovskite Materials
by Hongmei Zhao, Lei Zhao, Song Li, Yanfang Chu, Yucheng Sun, Bin Xie, Junjie He and Jing Li
Crystals 2022, 12(5), 573; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst12050573 - 20 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2322
Abstract
Perovskite solar cells (PSC) are considered promising next generation photovoltaic devices due to their low cost and high-power conversion efficiency (PCE). The perovskite material in the photovoltaic devices plays the fundamental role for the unique performances of PSC. Formamidinium based perovskite materials have [...] Read more.
Perovskite solar cells (PSC) are considered promising next generation photovoltaic devices due to their low cost and high-power conversion efficiency (PCE). The perovskite material in the photovoltaic devices plays the fundamental role for the unique performances of PSC. Formamidinium based perovskite materials have become a hot-topic for research due to their excellent characteristics, such as a lower band gap (1.48 V), broader light absorption, and better thermal stability compared to methylammonium based perovskite materials. There are four phases of perovskite materials, named the cubic α-phase, tetragonal β-phase, orthorhombic γ-phase, and δ-phase (yellow). Many research focus on the transition of α-phase and δ-phase. α-Phase FA-based perovskite is very useful for photovoltaic application. However, the phase stability of α-phase FA-based perovskite materials is quite poor. It transforms into its useless δ-phase at room temperature. This instability will lead the degradation of PCE and the other optoelectronic properties. For the practical application of PSC, it is urgent to understand more about the mechanism of this transformation and boost the stability of α-Phase FA-based perovskite materials. This review describes the strategies developed in the past several years, such as mixed cations, anion exchange, dimensions controlling, and surface engineering. These discussions present a perspective on the stability of α-phase of FA-based perovskite materials and the coming challenges in this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanotechnologies in Perovskite Solar Cells)
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