Special Issue "Climate Change and Land"

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Elena Lioubimtseva
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography and Sustainable Planning, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI 49401, USA
Interests: human vulnerability and adaptations to climate change; food security; land-use and land-cover changes; satellite remote sensing applications for environmental monitoring; climate adaptation planning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Welcome to the Special Issue Climate Change and Land, which explores the relationships between climate change and land changes and processes. Changing patterns in temperature and precipitation are already undermining food and water security, threatening livelihoods around the globe and causing human migration and the loss of biodiversity. Land management practices are not only impacted by climate change but are also contributing to it at various scales, modifying the Earth’s energy balance and biogeochemical cycles. Almost a quarter of anthropogenic carbon emissions today come from land use. Fortunately, land restoration and carbon sequestration practices offer many solutions to the global climate crisis.

This interdisciplinary issue provides a platform for scholarly contributions offering empirical or theoretical research on climate and land interactions and monitoring, and land-related policy solutions for climate change. Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Impacts of climate change on food and water security and livelihoods;
  • Monitoring climate change and land-use and land-cover changes (LULCC);
  • Human vulnerability, landscapes, and climate change;
  • Land-related mitigation and adaptation strategies;
  • Community education, empowerment and engagement in climate and land-use education;
  • Mutually supportive climate and land-use policies and sustainable land management.

Dr. Elena Lioubimtseva
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Climate is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Coupled systems and climate change
  • LULCC monitoring and modeling
  • Carbon sinks and sources
  • Sequestration
  • Food and water security and livelihoods
  • Mitigation
  • Adaptation
  • Resilience
  • Climate and land policies
  • Sustainable land management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Climate Aridity and the Geographical Shift of Olive Trees in a Mediterranean Northern Region
Climate 2021, 9(4), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli9040064 - 12 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 945
Abstract
Climate change leverages landscape transformations and exerts variable pressure on natural environments and rural systems. Earlier studies outlined how Mediterranean Europe has become a global hotspot of climate warming and land use change. The present work assumes the olive tree, a typical Mediterranean [...] Read more.
Climate change leverages landscape transformations and exerts variable pressure on natural environments and rural systems. Earlier studies outlined how Mediterranean Europe has become a global hotspot of climate warming and land use change. The present work assumes the olive tree, a typical Mediterranean crop, as a candidate bioclimatic indicator, delineating the latent impact of climate aridity on traditional cropping systems at the northern range of the biogeographical distribution of the olive tree. Since the olive tree follows a well-defined latitude gradient with a progressive decline in both frequency and density moving toward the north, we considered Italy as an appropriate case to investigate how climate change may (directly or indirectly) influence the spatial distribution of this crop. By adopting an exploratory approach grounded in the quali-quantitative analysis of official statistics, the present study investigates long-term changes over time in the spatial distribution of the olive tree surface area in Northern Italy, a region traditionally considered outside the ecological range of the species because of unsuitable climate conditions. Olive tree cultivated areas increased in Northern Italy, especially in flat districts and upland areas, while they decreased in Central and Southern Italy under optimal climate conditions, mostly because of land abandonment. The most intense expansion of the olive tree surface area in Italy was observed in the northern region between 1992 and 2000 and corresponded with the intensification of winter droughts during the late 1980s and the early 1990s and local warming since the mid-1980s. Assuming the intrinsic role of farmers in the expansion of the olive tree into the suboptimal land of Northern Italy, the empirical results of our study suggest how climate aridity and local warming may underlie the shift toward the north in the geographical range of the olive tree in the Mediterranean Basin. We finally discussed the implications of the olive range shift as a part of a possible landscape scenario for a more arid future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Land)
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Article
Observed and Projected Changes in Temperature and Precipitation in the Core Crop Region of the Humid Pampa, Argentina
Climate 2021, 9(3), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli9030040 - 27 Feb 2021
Viewed by 983
Abstract
The core crop region of the Humid Pampa is one of the most productive agricultural lands around the world and depends highly on climate conditions. This study assesses climate variability, climate extremes, and observed and projected climate changes there, using 1911–2019 observations and [...] Read more.
The core crop region of the Humid Pampa is one of the most productive agricultural lands around the world and depends highly on climate conditions. This study assesses climate variability, climate extremes, and observed and projected climate changes there, using 1911–2019 observations and CMIP5 model simulations. Since 1970, the annual mean temperature has risen by 1 °C and the mean annual minimum and maximum temperatures by 2 and 0.5 °C, respectively. The frequency of warm days and nights increased, and cold days and nights decreased. Heatwaves became longer and more intense, and cold waves decreased with less frost events. Annual precipitation increased by 10% from 1911, mainly in summer, and years with excess precipitation outnumbered those with a deficit. Both intense precipitation events and consecutive dry days grew, suggesting more annual precipitation falling on fewer days. Projections show a warming of 1 °C by 2035, regardless of the scenario. From then on until 2100, mean temperature will increase by 2 and 3–3.5 °C in the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios, respectively. Annual precipitation will grow 8 and 16% from current values by 2100 in the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios, respectively. No major precipitation changes are projected in the RCP2.6 scenario. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Land)
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