Special Issue "Novel 2D Material-Based Electrochemical Sensors"

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Dale A. C. Brownson
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Faculty of Science and Engineering, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, UK
Interests: electrochemistry; electron transfer; sensors; nanotechnology; fundamental characterization of 2D materials (including graphene); energy generation and storage
Dr. Christopher W. Foster
Website
Guest Editor
Manchester Metropolitan University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Manchester, United Kingdom
Interests: screen-printed electrodes; 3D printing; 2D nanomaterials; modified electrode surfaces; energy storage devices; electron transfer
Prof. Dr. Craig E. Banks
Website
Guest Editor
Manchester Metropolitan University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Manchester, United Kingdom
Interests: electrochemistry; 3D printing; 2D material electrochemistry; sensor design and development; screen-printing and related sensor fabrication; electron transfer; sono-electrochemistry; nanoparticles
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the exploration of 2D materials has been widely employed to enhance chemically important applications. There have been significant breakthroughs and advancements in a number of fields, one of which is that of electrochemical sensors. In light of this, 2D material-based electrochemical sensors are attractive in terms of their applicability in environmental, biological, forensic and fundamental studies, to name a few.

The focus of this Special Issue is on novel 2D material-based electrochemical sensors, focusing on the incorporation of 2D nanomaterials (such as, graphene, h-BN, MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, WSe2, phosphorene, antimonene, and so on) and their application within electrochemical sensors. We welcome submissions concerning any electrochemical technique, such as voltammetric, amperometric, impedimetric, etc., from either direct and/or indirect electrochemical routes. Furthermore, the approach for incorporating 2D materials into the electrochemical set-up is a critical factor when considering the performance of such analytical devices and hence we strongly encourage contributions from a range of such fabrication routes, including: screen-printed; 3D-printed; electro-deposited; drop-casted; single crystal; thin films; composites. Researchers working in these specific fields are strongly encouraged to submit their work.

Dr. Dale A. C. Brownson
Dr. Christopher W. Foster
Prof. Dr. Craig E. Banks
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Electrochemistry 
  • 2D Nanomaterials
  • Sensor design/development 
  • Sensor fabrication 
  • Modified electrode surfaces 
  • Composite electrodes 
  • Analytical methods
  • Electron transfer

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Screen Printed Electrode Based Detection Systems for the Antibiotic Amoxicillin in Aqueous Samples Utilising Molecularly Imprinted Polymers as Synthetic Receptors
Chemosensors 2020, 8(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors8010005 - 29 Dec 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) were synthesised for the selective detection of amoxicillin in aqueous samples. Different functional monomers were tested to determine the optimal composition via batch rebinding experiments. Two different sensor platforms were tested using the same MIP solution; one being bulk [...] Read more.
Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) were synthesised for the selective detection of amoxicillin in aqueous samples. Different functional monomers were tested to determine the optimal composition via batch rebinding experiments. Two different sensor platforms were tested using the same MIP solution; one being bulk synthesized and surface modified Screen Printed Electrodes (SPEs) via drop casting the microparticles onto the electrode surface and the other being UV polymerized directly onto the SPE surface in the form of a thin film. The sensors were used to measure amoxicillin in conjunction with the Heat-Transfer Method (HTM), a low-cost and simple thermal detection method that is based on differences in the thermal resistance at the solid–liquid interface. It was demonstrated that both sensor platforms could detect amoxicillin in the relevant concentration range with Limits of Detection (LOD) of 1.89 ± 1.03 nM and 0.54 ± 0.10 nM for the drop cast and direct polymerisation methods respectively. The sensor platform utilising direct UV polymerisation exhibited an enhanced response for amoxicillin detection, a reduced sensor preparation time and the selectivity of the platform was proven through the addition of nafcillin, a pharmacophore of similar shape and size. The use of MIP-modified SPEs combined with thermal detection provides sensors that can be used for fast and low-cost detection of analytes on-site, which holds great potential for contaminants in environmental aqueous samples. The platform and synthesis methods are generic and by adapting the MIP layer it is possible to expand this sensor platform to a variety of relevant targets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel 2D Material-Based Electrochemical Sensors)
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