Plasma Catalytic Pollution Degradation: State of the Art and Future Directions

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2023) | Viewed by 10563

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, China
Interests: Non-thermal plasma for pollution control; plasma–catalysis collaborative proccess
College of Ecology and the Environment, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037, China
Interests: ozonation; photocatalysis; wastewater treatment; POPs; pollution migration and transformation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Non-thermal plasma is a kind of AOPs, which have presented an excellent treatment for the organic compounds. During the oxidation process, many reactive species as well as some physical effects have the coexisting multiple effects on the organic pollutants degradation. With the development to the depth, more attention has been paid to the problem of non-efficient utilization of the reactive chemicals and the physical effects in the plasma system, which has limited the application of the technology. Based on the characteristics of the non-thermal plasma oxidation, uniting it with other catalysis process has become the newly researching trend for the development of the technology.

As the topic of plasma–catalysis collaborative process for pollution control is very hot and continues to rise, we are preparing for the latest Special Issue on " Plasma Catalytic Pollution Degradation: State of the Art and Future Directions" in Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344), which is one of the MDPI open access journals, indexed by Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), and has received the latest impact factor of 4.501 (2021).

For your professionalism in this field, we would like to invite you to submit related papers to us. If you have papers ready for publication, please feel free to submit. Your paper will be handled as soon as possible.

Prof. Dr. Huijuan Wang
Dr. He Guo
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Non-thermal plasma 
  • Chemical catalysis 
  • Photocatalysis 
  • Chemical-photo catalysis 
  • Other catalysis 
  • Collaborative degradation.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 4260 KiB  
Article
Crystalline Violet Wastewater Treatment by Low-Temperature Plasma Combined with Industrial Solid Waste Red Mud
by Weiwei Zhang, Haixia Wu, Yongjun Sun, Qu Wu, Jiliang Bi, Juncheng Jin, Minglong Fang and Zhiru Shi
Catalysts 2022, 12(8), 908; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12080908 - 17 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1724
Abstract
Low-temperature plasma (LTP) technology has been successfully used to treat persistent organic pollutants in water. Efforts have been devoted to combine catalysts and LTP to improve the degradation efficiency of pollutants and energy utilization efficiency. Herein, industrial solid waste red mud as a [...] Read more.
Low-temperature plasma (LTP) technology has been successfully used to treat persistent organic pollutants in water. Efforts have been devoted to combine catalysts and LTP to improve the degradation efficiency of pollutants and energy utilization efficiency. Herein, industrial solid waste red mud as a novel catalyst was added to an LTP system to treat crystalline violet (CV) wastewater. The energy yield at 50% CV decomposition and TOC after a 30 min reaction by the plasma treatment, red mud adsorption, and red mud/plasma treatment were compared. The effects of the main operating parameters, such as red mud dosing amount, initial pH, discharge voltage, and initial concentration of CV, on the removal efficiency of CV were investigated. The best degradation of CV was achieved with a red mud dosage of 2 g, a neutral environment, and a discharge voltage of 22 kV. When the red mud was recycled three times, the removal efficiency decreased a little in the red mud/plasma system. Hydroxyl radical plays an important role in the treatment of CV. The red mud was characterized by BET, SEM, XRD, and FT-IR, and the structure of the red mud was not greatly affected after being used in the red mud/plasma system. Full article
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14 pages, 5626 KiB  
Article
Soot Oxidation over γ-Al2O3-Supported Manganese-Based Binary Catalyst in a Dielectric Barrier Discharge Reactor
by Xinbo Zhu, Xiqiang Wu, Jin Liu, Jianbin Luo, Zhengda Yang, Ye Jiang and Geng Chen
Catalysts 2022, 12(7), 716; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12070716 - 29 Jun 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1351
Abstract
In this work, soot oxidation was conducted over a series of Mn-X/γ-Al2O3 (M = Ce, Co and Cu) binary catalysts in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor. The soot conversion in the plasma–catalytic system was in the order of Mn/γ-Al2 [...] Read more.
In this work, soot oxidation was conducted over a series of Mn-X/γ-Al2O3 (M = Ce, Co and Cu) binary catalysts in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor. The soot conversion in the plasma–catalytic system was in the order of Mn/γ-Al2O3 (57.7%) > Mn-Co/γ-Al2O3 (53.9%) > Mn-Ce/γ-Al2O3 (51.6%) > Mn-Cu/γ-Al2O3 (47.7%) during the 30 min soot oxidation process at 14 W and 150 °C. Meanwhile, the doping of Ce, Co and Cu slightly improved the CO2 selectivity of the process by 4.7% to 10.3% compared to soot oxidation over Mn/γ-Al2O3.It is worth to note that the order of CO2 selectivity was in the opposite order with soot oxidation rate. The effects of discharge power, oxygen content in the carrier gas and reaction temperature on plasma–catalytic soot oxidation was systematically analyzed. The catalyst characterizations, including N2 adsorption–desorption, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature-programmed reduction by H2 and temperature-programmed desorption of O2, were conducted to illustrate the reaction mechanisms of plasma–catalytic soot oxidation and reaction pathways. Full article
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19 pages, 4029 KiB  
Article
Sodium Percarbonate Activation by Plasma-Generated Ozone for Catalytic Degradation of Dye Wastewater: Role of Active Species and Degradation Process
by Jingwen Huang, Chendong Puyang and He Guo
Catalysts 2022, 12(7), 681; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12070681 - 22 Jun 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2110
Abstract
In this paper, sodium percarbonate (SPC) was activated by ozone (O3) from plasma for catalytic treatment of dye wastewater. Methyl blue (MB), a typical industrial dye, was selected as the target dye contaminant. Results showed that enhancing O3 dosage and [...] Read more.
In this paper, sodium percarbonate (SPC) was activated by ozone (O3) from plasma for catalytic treatment of dye wastewater. Methyl blue (MB), a typical industrial dye, was selected as the target dye contaminant. Results showed that enhancing O3 dosage and reducing MB concentration were beneficial to MB degradation. Compared to acid condition, a higher removal efficiency of MB was obtained in alkaline condition. With an increase of SPC dosage, the removal efficiency of MB first was raised, and then it declined. Under the optimal dosage of 50 mg/L, the removal efficiency of MB reached 85.7% with 30 min treatment time. The energy efficiency was improved from 5.21 g/kWh to 5.71 g/kWh. A synergetic effect can be established between O3 and SPC. Radical capture experiments verified that ·OH, ·O2, 1O2, and ·CO3 played important parts in MB degradation. With increasing reaction time, the amount of total organic carbon (TOC) declined and the amount of ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) increased. The addition of SPC enhanced the solution’s pH value and conductivity. The degradation pathway was proposed based on density functional theory (DFT) analysis and relevant literatures. The toxicity of MB was alleviated after O3/SPC treatment. The O3/SPC process was also suitable for the treatment of other dyes and actual wastewater. Full article
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Review

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24 pages, 1299 KiB  
Review
Pioneering the Future: A Trailblazing Review of the Fusion of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Machine Learning Revolutionizing Plasma Catalysis and Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor Design
by Muhammad Yousaf Arshad, Anam Suhail Ahmad, Jakub Mularski, Aleksandra Modzelewska, Mateusz Jackowski, Halina Pawlak-Kruczek and Lukasz Niedzwiecki
Catalysts 2024, 14(1), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal14010040 - 6 Jan 2024
Viewed by 2358
Abstract
The advancement of plasma technology is intricately linked with the utilization of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models, which play a pivotal role in the design and optimization of industrial-scale plasma reactors. This comprehensive compilation encapsulates the evolving landscape of plasma reactor design, encompassing [...] Read more.
The advancement of plasma technology is intricately linked with the utilization of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models, which play a pivotal role in the design and optimization of industrial-scale plasma reactors. This comprehensive compilation encapsulates the evolving landscape of plasma reactor design, encompassing fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, heat transfer, and radiation energy. By employing diverse tools such as FLUENT, Python, MATLAB, and Abaqus, CFD techniques unravel the complexities of turbulence, multiphase flow, and species transport. The spectrum of plasma behavior equations, including ion and electron densities, electric fields, and recombination reactions, is presented in a holistic manner. The modeling of non-thermal plasma reactors, underpinned by precise mathematical formulations and computational strategies, is further empowered by the integration of machine learning algorithms for predictive modeling and optimization. From biomass gasification to intricate chemical reactions, this work underscores the versatile potential of plasma hybrid modeling in reshaping various industrial processes. Within the sphere of plasma catalysis, modeling and simulation methodologies have paved the way for transformative progress. Encompassing reactor configurations, kinetic pathways, hydrogen production, waste valorization, and beyond, this compilation offers a panoramic view of the multifaceted dimensions of plasma catalysis. Microkinetic modeling and catalyst design emerge as focal points for optimizing CO2 conversion, while the intricate interplay between plasma and catalysts illuminates insights into ammonia synthesis, methane reforming, and hydrocarbon conversion. Leveraging neural networks and advanced modeling techniques enables predictive prowess in the optimization of plasma-catalytic processes. The integration of plasma and catalysts for diverse applications, from waste valorization to syngas production and direct CO2/CH4 conversion, exemplifies the wide-reaching potential of plasma catalysis in sustainable practices. Ultimately, this anthology underscores the transformative influence of modeling and simulation in shaping the forefront of plasma-catalytic processes, fostering innovation and sustainable applications. Full article
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22 pages, 4537 KiB  
Review
Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Coupled with Catalysis for Organic Wastewater Treatment: A Review
by He Guo, Yingying Su, Xinyi Yang, Yawen Wang, Zhen Li, Yifeng Wu and Jingyu Ren
Catalysts 2023, 13(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal13010010 - 22 Dec 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2389
Abstract
Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in advanced oxidation technology can degrade organic pollutants in water under mild conditions. It has the advantages of universality, simple reaction conditions, and no secondary pollution. However, the light, electrons, and low-reactive substances generated during the discharge process [...] Read more.
Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in advanced oxidation technology can degrade organic pollutants in water under mild conditions. It has the advantages of universality, simple reaction conditions, and no secondary pollution. However, the light, electrons, and low-reactive substances generated during the discharge process cannot be fully utilized, which limits the further application of DBD plasma. Therefore, the DBD system coupled with catalysis can not only solve the above problem, but also transforms the low-active substances into high-active substances and improves the degradation rate of organic pollutants. Based on this fact, this review focuses on the characteristics and principles of DBD plasma coupled with photocatalysis, adsorption, Fenton oxidation, persulfate oxidation and composite technology to treat organic wastewater. This review puts forward some problems of DBD synergetic catalysis technology, and looks forward to the future development direction of this technology to treat organic pollutants in water. Full article
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