Special Issue "TiO2-Based Materials for (Photo)Catalysis"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Giuseppina Pinuccia Cerrato
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Turin, Italy
Interests: oxide-based materials for (photo)catalysis; standard and innovative synthetic procedures; physicochemical characterization
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Claudia Letizia Bianchi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Milan, Italy
Interests: process intensification; photocatalysis; ultrasound; advanced materials synthesis; gas and liquid phase reactors
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Lorenzo Mino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Torino, Italy
Interests: surface science; photocatalysis; oxide nanomaterials; in situ/operando spectroscopy; synchrotron radiation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, oxide-based photocatalysts have emerged as crucial materials to face environmental and energy issues. The photocatalytic process involves the creation of electron/hole pairs and their subsequent transfer to the particle surface to perform the desired reduction and oxidation processes. The key requirement to obtain efficient photocatalysts is to engineer the band edge positions to produce the appropriate redox species and to efficiently absorb solar radiation. In this context, different approaches have been proposed, including doping with metal impurities or nonmetal atoms, preparation of oxygen-deficient oxide materials, and coupling with narrow band gap semiconductors. Shape-engineering is also emerging as an additional strategy to finely tune the physicochemical properties of photocatalytic materials to optimize surface reactivity and selectivity.

The present Special Issue of Catalysts is aimed at showing the current state-of-the-art in the synthesis, characterization, and modeling of oxide-based materials employed in advanced photocatalytic applications, including CO2 reduction, water splitting, and environmental remediation.

Prof. Dr. Giuseppina Pinuccia Cerrato
Prof. Dr. Claudia Letizia Bianchi
Dr. Lorenzo Mino
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Doped oxide photocatalysts
  • Shape-engineered oxide particles
  • Plasmonic oxide photocatalysts
  • Band gap engineering
  • Multiscale modeling
  • Photocatalytic reaction mechanisms
  • Photocatalytic water-splitting
  • Air treatment
  • Pollutants photodegradation
  • Artificial photosynthesis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Comparative Photo-Electrochemical and Photocatalytic Studies with Nanosized TiO2 Photocatalysts towards Organic Pollutants Oxidation
Catalysts 2021, 11(3), 349; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal11030349 - 09 Mar 2021
Viewed by 392
Abstract
The size of TiO2 can significantly affect both its photocatalytic and photo-electrochemical properties, thus altering the photooxidation of organic pollutants in air or water. In this work, we give an account of the photo-electrochemical and photocatalytic features of some nanosized TiO2 [...] Read more.
The size of TiO2 can significantly affect both its photocatalytic and photo-electrochemical properties, thus altering the photooxidation of organic pollutants in air or water. In this work, we give an account of the photo-electrochemical and photocatalytic features of some nanosized TiO2 commercial powders towards a model reaction, the photooxidation of acetone. Cyclic voltammograms (CV) of TiO2 particulate electrodes under UV illumination experiments were carried out in either saturated O2 or N2 solutions for a direct correlation with the photocatalytic process. In addition, the effect of different reaction conditions on the photocatalytic efficiency under UV light in both aqueous and gaseous phases was also investigated. CV curves with the addition of acetone under UV light showed a negative shift of the photocurrent onset, confirming the efficient transfer of photoproduced reactive oxygen species (ROSs), e.g., hydroxyl radicals or holes to acetone molecules. The photocatalytic experiments showed that the two nano-sized samples exhibit the best photocatalytic performance. The different photoactivity of the larger-sized samples is probably attributed to their morphological differences, affecting both the amount and distribution of free ROSs involved in the photooxidation reaction. Finally, a direct correlation between the photocatalytic measurements in gas phase and the photo-electrochemical measurements in aqueous phase is given, thus evincing the important role of the substrate-surface interaction with similar acetone concentrations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue TiO2-Based Materials for (Photo)Catalysis)
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Open AccessArticle
Visible-Light-Responsive Antibacterial Property of Boron-Doped Titania Films
Catalysts 2020, 10(11), 1349; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10111349 - 19 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 409
Abstract
Pure titanium dioxide TiO2 photocatalytic substrates exhibit antibacterial activity only when they are irradiated with ultraviolet light, which comprises high-energy wavelengths that damage all life. Impurity doping of TiO2-related materials enables visible light to stimulate photocatalytic activity, which enhances opportunities [...] Read more.
Pure titanium dioxide TiO2 photocatalytic substrates exhibit antibacterial activity only when they are irradiated with ultraviolet light, which comprises high-energy wavelengths that damage all life. Impurity doping of TiO2-related materials enables visible light to stimulate photocatalytic activity, which enhances opportunities for TiO2 to be used as a disinfectant in living environments. Boron-doped TiO2 displays visible-light-responsive bactericidal properties. However, because boron-derived compounds also exert notable antibacterial effects, most reports did not clearly demonstrate the extent to which the bactericidal property of boron-doped TiO2 is contributed by visible-light-stimulated photocatalysis. In addition, TiO2 thin films have considerable potential for applications in equipment that requires sterilization; however, the antibacterial properties of boron-doped TiO2 thin films have been examined by only a few studies. We found that boron-doped TiO2 thin films displayed visible-light-driven antibacterial properties. Moreover, because boron compounds may have intrinsic antibacterial properties, using control groups maintained in the dark, we clearly demonstrated that visible light stimulated the photocatalysis of boron-doped TiO2 thin films but not the residue boron compounds display antibacterial property. The bactericidal effects induced by visible light are equally potent for the elimination of the model organism Escherichia coli and human pathogens, such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes. The antibacterial applications of boron-doped TiO2 thin films are described, and relevant perspectives discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue TiO2-Based Materials for (Photo)Catalysis)
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Open AccessArticle
Combined Effect of Photocatalyst, Superplasticizer, and Glass Fiber on the Photocatalytic Activity and Technical Parameters of Gypsum
Catalysts 2020, 10(4), 385; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10040385 - 01 Apr 2020
Viewed by 571
Abstract
In this study, gypsum plasters enriched with the modified photocatalyst TiO2/N and additive components were prepared and analyzed in detail. The aim of this work was to recognize the combined impact of a photocatalyst, polycarboxylic superplasticizer (SP), and glass fiber (F) [...] Read more.
In this study, gypsum plasters enriched with the modified photocatalyst TiO2/N and additive components were prepared and analyzed in detail. The aim of this work was to recognize the combined impact of a photocatalyst, polycarboxylic superplasticizer (SP), and glass fiber (F) on the properties of the composed building materials. The mutual compatibility was verified in relation to self-cleaning and air-purifying activity as well as to the technical parameters defined in standards for gypsum materials. The measurements revealed that photocatalytic gypsum material can have high mechanical strength and limited shrinkage as a result of superplasticizer contribution in form of a water-reducing and well-dispersive agent. Normal consistency was achieved by the addition of 0.01 wt % of SP to photocatalytic gypsum mortar or by the addition of 0.2 wt % of SP with a 12% reduction of water. This study also explains why glass fiber fulfills the role of inner reinforcement only if a superplasticizer is simultaneously added to the gypsum matrix. It is possible, by the combined effect of TiO2/N, a polycarboxylic superplasticizer, and glass fiber, to achieve NOx degradation at a high level. Moreover, the significantly improved self-cleaning properties of the complex gypsum plasters surfaces from dye pollutants in comparison to a gypsum plaster with solely a TiO2/N photocatalyst indicate the synergistic effect of the three considered additives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue TiO2-Based Materials for (Photo)Catalysis)
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