Emerging Research in Integrated Real Wastewater Treatments via Advanced Catalytic Oxidation

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Photocatalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 2237

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Departamento de Ingeniería Química y Química Física, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz, Spain
Interests: ozone; Fenton; monopersulfate; photocatalysis; wet air oxidation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The integrated treatment of real wastewater, enhanced via the incorporation of catalysts, represents a cutting-edge approach to addressing the challenges posed by complex wastewater compositions. Catalysts play a pivotal role in accelerating chemical reactions and promoting the breakdown of recalcitrant pollutants. In the context of wastewater treatment, these catalysts facilitate advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) that can effectively target organic and inorganic contaminants. The use of heterogeneous or homogeneous catalysts enhances the efficiency of degradation processes. These catalysts can activate powerful oxidants, such as sulfates or hydroxyl radicals. These play crucial roles in breaking down persistent pollutants into more benign byproducts.

Research into the treatment of real wastewater offers several advantages over studies focused on model pollutants:

  • Real wastewater is a complex mixture mimicking actual environmental conditions. Research with real wastewater provides insights that are more applicable to practical scenarios.
  • Interactions between different contaminants in real wastewater can lead to synergistic or antagonistic effects.
  • Real wastewater studies provide a more accurate evaluation of the performance of treatment technologies under practical conditions.
  • Regulatory standards for wastewater discharge are typically based on real wastewater characteristics.
  • Findings from real wastewater research are more easily translatable to field-scale applications.

Moving toward more sustainable and resource-efficient water management practices, the integration of several stages into wastewater treatment represents a promising frontier, pushing the boundaries of technology to achieve higher levels of purification while minimizing the impact of wastewater discharge on ecosystems.

Prof. Dr. Francisco Javier Rivas Toledo
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • advanced oxidation processes (AOP)
  • catalysis
  • integrated treatments
  • photocatalysis
  • physico-chemical treatments
  • real wastewater
  • industrial effluents

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 5395 KiB  
Article
Determination of Activation Energy from Decolorization Reactions of Synthetic Dyes by Fenton Processes Using the Behnajady–Modirshahla–Ghanbary Kinetic Model
by Márcio Daniel Nicodemos Ramos, Juan Pablo Pereira Lima and André Aguiar
Catalysts 2024, 14(4), 273; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal14040273 - 18 Apr 2024
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Abstract
The present work used the Behnajady–Modirshahla–Ghanbary (BMG) kinetic model to determine the initial reaction rates (1/m), which were used to calculate the activation energy (Ea) from the decolorization of synthetic dyes by Fenton processes (Fe2+/H2O [...] Read more.
The present work used the Behnajady–Modirshahla–Ghanbary (BMG) kinetic model to determine the initial reaction rates (1/m), which were used to calculate the activation energy (Ea) from the decolorization of synthetic dyes by Fenton processes (Fe2+/H2O2, Fe2+/H2O2/reducer and Fe3+/H2O2/reducer). When increasing the temperature and adding Fe3+-reducing compounds (3-Hydroxyanthranilic Acid, Hydroquinone, Gallic Acid, Cysteine or Ascorbic Acid), increases in the 1/m values were observed. When studying the classical Fenton reaction (Fe2+/H2O2), almost all added reducers had decreased Ea. For example, 3-Hydroxyanthranilic Acid decreased the Ea related to the decolorization of the Phenol Red dye by 39%, while Ascorbic Acid decreased the Ea of Safranin T decolorization by 23%. These results demonstrate that the reducers increased the initial reaction rate and decreased the energy barrier to improve Fenton-based decolorization of dyes. When comparing the reaction systems in presence of reducers (Fen+/H2O2/reducer), the reactions initially containing Fe2+ presented lower Ea than reactions catalyzed by Fe3+. That way, the activation energy obtained through the 1/m values of the BMG model highlighted the pro-oxidant effect of reducers in Fenton processes to degrade dyes. Full article
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13 pages, 5610 KiB  
Article
Table Olive Manufacturing Wastewater Treatment Using the Peroxymonosulfate/Fe(III) System
by Francisco Javier Rivas, Fernando J. Beltrán and Olga Gimeno
Catalysts 2024, 14(2), 121; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal14020121 - 2 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Wastewater generated in table olive manufacturing processes (WWTOMP) is a seasonal waste difficult to manage due to the high salinity content. The treatment of WWTOMP has been accomplished by including a precoagulation stage with aluminum sulfate, oxidation using the peroxymonosulfate/Fe(III) system, and a [...] Read more.
Wastewater generated in table olive manufacturing processes (WWTOMP) is a seasonal waste difficult to manage due to the high salinity content. The treatment of WWTOMP has been accomplished by including a precoagulation stage with aluminum sulfate, oxidation using the peroxymonosulfate/Fe(III) system, and a final aerobic biological stage. The optimum conditions of precoagulation led to a chemical oxygen demand removal rate of roughly 30–35% without the need for pH adjustment. The peroxymonosulfate(PMS)/Fe(III) system was thereafter applied to the effluent after coagulation. The addition of PMS lowered the initial pH to acidic conditions (pH = 1.5–2.0). Under these operating conditions, the initial PMS concentration and the initial Fe(III) dose showed optimum values. An excess of the oxidant and/or the catalyst partially inhibited the process efficiency, and pH exerted a significant influence. COD removal was substantially increased as the pH of the solution was moved toward circumneutral values in the interval 5–4. Moreover, at pH values of 5 and 7, PMS was capable of reducing COD without the need for Fe(III) presence. The direct oxidation of organics by PMS or the generation of chloride-based oxidants (Cl2 or HClO) is suggested to occur in parallel to the radical attack from PMS decomposition. An attempt to biologically reduce the final COD to discharge limits failed, mainly due to the high salinity content; however, the 1:2 dilution led to the reduction in COD from 6 to 2 g L−1. Acclimated sludges or saline content reduction should be first considered. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Application of the Fenton process for the removal of emerging pollutants in real wastewater - A review
Authors: Bracamontes-Ruelas, A.R.: Reynoso-Cuevas, L.
Affiliation: Departamento de Ingeniería Sustentable, Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Calle CIMAV 110, Ejido Arroyo Seco, Durango 34147, Mexico.

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