Special Issue "Plasma Processing for Carbon-based Materials"

A special issue of C (ISSN 2311-5629).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Mineo Hiramatsu

Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, Tempaku, Nagoya, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: synthesis of diamond and carbon nanostructures including nanotubes and graphene; application of carbon nanostructures in the fields of energy generation and storage, electrochemical and bio-sensing, and cell culturing; plasma processing of materials including thin film formation, etching, and surface treatment; diagnostics of processing plasmas using spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbon-based materials include diamond, diamond-like carbon (DLC), amorphous carbon as well as several graphene-based nanostructures. They are promising materials that can be potentially used in the fields of mechanical, optical, electric, electronic, electrochemical, bio, agricultural, and environmental applications. Most of carbon-based materials can be synthesized using several plasma apparatuses. Morphology including crystallinity and structure as well as mechanical, electrical, and optical properties of carbon-based materials should be controlled according to their applications. Plasma processing has a significant role in fabricating carbon-based materials and achieving their practical use in many areas. In order to realize industrial application using carbon-based materials, processing plasma should be optimized depending on their use. Sometimes, it is desirable to develop novel plasma processing specific to the materials. This Special Issue covers development of plasma processes for the synthesis of carbon-based materials including diamond, DLC, amorphous carbon, and several graphene-based nanostructures; investigation on the post processes such as integration techniques including etching and surface functionalization; diagnostics of plasma used for the synthesis of carbon-based materials. Emerging applications using carbon-based materials are also welcome. Hopefully this Special Issue forms a valuable contribution to the knowledge of plasma processing of carbon-based materials and stimulates further development of these fields. We look forward to your submissions.

Prof. Dr. Mineo Hiramatsu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Diamond
  • Carbon nanotube
  • Graphene
  • Carbon nanostructures
  • DLC
  • Amorphous carbon
  • Plasma-enhanced CVD
  • Sputtering
  • Plasma synthesis of carbon-based materials
  • Plasma etching
  • Surface treatment and functionalization using plasma
  • Plasma diagnostics
  • Characterization of carbon based-materials
  • Application of carbon based-materials

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Plasma Oxidation Printing into DLC and Graphite for Surface Functionalization
Received: 18 December 2018 / Revised: 22 February 2019 / Accepted: 26 February 2019 / Published: 11 March 2019
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Abstract
A diamond-like carbon (DLC) film, coated on a AISI420-J2 stainless steel substrate and vertically aligned graphite (VAG), was structured by high-density plasma oxidation to work as a DLC-punch for micro-stamping and DLC-nozzle array for micro-dispensing, in addition to acting as a copper-plated thermal [...] Read more.
A diamond-like carbon (DLC) film, coated on a AISI420-J2 stainless steel substrate and vertically aligned graphite (VAG), was structured by high-density plasma oxidation to work as a DLC-punch for micro-stamping and DLC-nozzle array for micro-dispensing, in addition to acting as a copper-plated thermal spreader, respectively. Thick DLC films were micro-patterned by maskless lithography and directly plasma-etched to remove the unmasked regions. Thick VAG (Ca plates were micro-patterned by screen-printing and selectively etched to activate the surface. Raman spectroscopy as well as electric resistivity measurement proved that there was no degradation of VAG by this surface activation. Wet plating was utilized to prove that copper wettability was improved by this surface treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Processing for Carbon-based Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Electrochemical Reaction in Hydrogen Peroxide and Structural Change of Platinum Nanoparticle-Supported Carbon Nanowalls Grown Using Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition
Received: 3 December 2018 / Revised: 4 January 2019 / Accepted: 17 January 2019 / Published: 24 January 2019
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Abstract
Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) reactions on platinum nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanowalls (Pt-CNWs) under potential applications were investigated on a platform of CNWs grown on carbon fiber paper (CFP) using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Through repeated cyclic voltammetry (CV), measurements of 1000 [...] Read more.
Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) reactions on platinum nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanowalls (Pt-CNWs) under potential applications were investigated on a platform of CNWs grown on carbon fiber paper (CFP) using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Through repeated cyclic voltammetry (CV), measurements of 1000 cycles using the Pt-CNW electrodes in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution with 240 μM of H2O2, the observed response peak currents of H2O2 reduction decreased with the number of cycles, which is attributed to decomposition of H2O2. After CV measurements for a total of 3000 cycles, the density and height of CNWs were reduced and their surface morphology changed. Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) compositional mapping revealed agglomeration of Pt nanoparticles around the top edges of CNWs. The degradation mechanism of Pt-CNWs under potential application with H2O2 is discussed by focusing on the behavior of OH radicals generated by the H2O2 reduction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Processing for Carbon-based Materials)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Investigation of Nanographene Produced by In-Liquid Plasma for Development of Highly Durable Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 14 November 2018 / Accepted: 17 November 2018 / Published: 23 November 2018
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Abstract
Recently, polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are attracting a lot of attention owing to their small size and relatively low working temperature (below 80 °C), which enables their usage in automobiles and household power generation. However, PEFCs have a problem with decreased output [...] Read more.
Recently, polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are attracting a lot of attention owing to their small size and relatively low working temperature (below 80 °C), which enables their usage in automobiles and household power generation. However, PEFCs have a problem with decreased output caused by corrosion of amorphous carbon, which is commonly used as a catalytic carrier. This problem could be solved by the usage of carbon nanostructures with a stronger crystal structure than amorphous carbon. In this work, nanographene supported by Pt nanoparticles was synthesized and examined for possible applications in the development of PEFCs with increased durability. Nanographene was synthesized by in-liquid plasma generated in ethanol using alternating current (AC) high voltage. A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) was constructed, where Pt nanoparticle-supported nanographene was used as the catalytic layer. Power generation characteristics of the MEA were evaluated and current density for the developed MEA was found to be approximately 240 mA/cm2. From the electrochemical evaluation, it was found that the durability of Pt nanoparticle-supported nanographene was about seven times higher than that of carbon black. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Processing for Carbon-based Materials)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Microwave-Driven Plasma-Mediated Methane Cracking: Product Carbon Characterization
Received: 1 October 2018 / Revised: 20 October 2018 / Accepted: 1 November 2018 / Published: 8 November 2018
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Abstract
Methane is the primary industrial H2 source, with the vast majority produced by steam reforming of methane—a highly CO2- and water-intensive process. Alternatives to steam reforming, such as microwave-driven plasma-mediated methane decomposition, offer benefits of no water consumption and zero [...] Read more.
Methane is the primary industrial H2 source, with the vast majority produced by steam reforming of methane—a highly CO2- and water-intensive process. Alternatives to steam reforming, such as microwave-driven plasma-mediated methane decomposition, offer benefits of no water consumption and zero CO2 process emissions while also producing solid carbon formed by pyrolytic reactions and aided by a plasma reactive environment. The economic viability of pyrolytic methane decomposition as a hydrogen source will depend upon the commercial applications of the solid carbon product—which, in turn, will depend upon its physical and chemical characteristics. This study focuses on material characterization of the solid carbon (secondary) product. Characterization by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals forms ranging from graphitic to amorphous. Thermogravimetric analyses reveal three forms by their differing oxidative reactivity, while X-ray diffraction analyses support the different crystalline forms as suggested by Thermogravimetric analysis. Plasma perturbation of the radical pool, elevating radical temperatures and boosting concentrations, is proposed as altering the reaction paths towards solid carbon formation, resulting in the different sp2 forms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Processing for Carbon-based Materials)
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Graphical abstract

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