Biomimetic Functional (Nano)materials

A special issue of Biomimetics (ISSN 2313-7673).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021) | Viewed by 17540

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Chemical, Materials and Production Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, P. le Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples, Italy
2. Center for Colloid and Surface Science (CSGI), Via della Lastruccia, 80100 Sesto Fiorentino, Italy
Interests: nanochemistry; colloids; amphiphiles; hybrid nanomaterials; functional biointerfaces; emulsions; EPR spectroscopy; neutron scattering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical, Materials and Production Engineering (DICMaPI), University of Naples Federico II, p. le V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples, Italy
Interests: nanomaterials synthesis; structure–function relationships; thermo-analytical methodologies; hybrid materials design; photocatalysis; green chemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nature provides a wide range of materials with multiple functions and impressive performances, made with a strict structural control from the molecular to the macroscopic scale, even following sustainable processes. Learning from nature’s strategies appears as the most promising approach to the design and formulation of high-performance multifunctional (nano)materials and devices, implementing green methodologies. In fact, studying biological systems can shed light on self-assembly processes, materials–cells interactions, supramolecular as well as hierarchical structures, interaction at the interface between inorganic and organic systems, as well as chemistry of hybrid and nanocomposite materials. This knowledge can constitute a powerful tool and holds huge promise in driving the design of cutting-edge functional (nano)materials for advanced technological applications ranging from superhydrophobic and self-cleaning surfaces, antioxidant and antimicrobial systems, self-healing (nano)materials, energy conservation facilities, and dry adhesion solutions to biomedical devices.

This Special Issue aims at collecting theoretical, experimental, and review contributions from a multidisciplinary community of chemists, physicists, biologists, material scientists, and engineers working on bioinspired chemistry and functional materials. It will provide an updated view of current achievements as well as hot challenges in this fast-growing field.

Submissions are welcome especially (but not exclusively) in the following areas:

  • Self-healing (nano)materials;
  • Biomineralization processes;
  • Super-hydrophobic surfaces;
  • Self-cleaning surfaces;
  • Regenerative (nano)medicine;
  • Tissue engineering;
  • Antimicrobial (nano)materials;
  • Structural colors;
  • Processing–structure–property relationship.

Dr. Giuseppe Vitiello
Dr. Giuseppina Luciani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomimetics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • green chemistry
  • nanostructured materials
  • synthesis methods
  • hierarchical structures
  • self-healing materials
  • biomineralization processes
  • self-cleaning surfaces
  • processing–structure–property relationship
  • regenerative medicine

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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30 pages, 8579 KiB  
Article
Facile Synthesis of Antimicrobial Aloe Vera-“Smart” Triiodide-PVP Biomaterials
by Zehra Edis and Samir Haj Bloukh
Biomimetics 2020, 5(3), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics5030045 - 17 Sep 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 4283
Abstract
Antibiotic resistance is an eminent threat for the survival of mankind. Nosocomial infections caused by multidrug resistant microorganisms are a reason for morbidity and mortality worldwide. Plant-based antimicrobial agents are based on synergistic mechanisms which prevent resistance and have been used for centuries [...] Read more.
Antibiotic resistance is an eminent threat for the survival of mankind. Nosocomial infections caused by multidrug resistant microorganisms are a reason for morbidity and mortality worldwide. Plant-based antimicrobial agents are based on synergistic mechanisms which prevent resistance and have been used for centuries against ailments. We suggest the use of cost-effective, eco-friendly Aloe Vera Barbadensis Miller (AV)-iodine biomaterials as a new generation of antimicrobial agents. In a facile, one-pot synthesis, we encapsulated fresh AV gel with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizing agent and incorporated iodine moieties in the form of iodine (I2) and sodium iodide (NaI) into the polymer matrix. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), x-ray diffraction (XRD), microstructural analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) verified the composition of AV-PVP-I2, AV-PVP-I2-NaI. AV, AV-PVP, AV-PVP-I2, AV-PVP-I2-NaI, and AV-PVP-NaI were tested in-vitro by disc diffusion assay and dip-coated on polyglycolic acid (PGA) sutures against ten microbial reference strains. All the tested pathogens were more susceptible towards AV-PVP-I2 due to the inclusion of “smart” triiodides with halogen bonding in vitro and on dip-coated sutures. The biocomplexes AV-PVP-I2, AV-PVP-I2-NaI showed remarkable antimicrobial properties. “Smart” biohybrids with triiodide inclusions have excellent antifungal and promising antimicrobial activities, with potential use against surgical site infections (SSI) and as disinfecting agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Functional (Nano)materials)
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Review

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23 pages, 4791 KiB  
Review
Using X-ray Diffraction Techniques for Biomimetic Drug Development, Formulation, and Polymorphic Characterization
by Israel Rodríguez, Ritika Gautam and Arthur D. Tinoco
Biomimetics 2021, 6(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics6010001 - 30 Dec 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 5786
Abstract
Drug development is a decades-long, multibillion dollar investment that often limits itself. To decrease the time to drug approval, efforts are focused on drug targets and drug formulation for optimal biocompatibility and efficacy. X-ray structural characterization approaches have catalyzed the drug discovery and [...] Read more.
Drug development is a decades-long, multibillion dollar investment that often limits itself. To decrease the time to drug approval, efforts are focused on drug targets and drug formulation for optimal biocompatibility and efficacy. X-ray structural characterization approaches have catalyzed the drug discovery and design process. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD) reveals important structural details and molecular interactions for the manifestation of a disease or for therapeutic effect. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) has provided a method to determine the different phases, purity, and stability of biological drug compounds that possess crystallinity. Recently, synchrotron sources have enabled wider access to the study of noncrystalline or amorphous solids. One valuable technique employed to determine atomic arrangements and local atom ordering of amorphous materials is the pair distribution function (PDF). PDF has been used in the study of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs). ASDs are made up of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) within a drug dispersed at the molecular level in an amorphous polymeric carrier. This information is vital for appropriate formulation of a drug for stability, administration, and efficacy purposes. Natural or biomimetic products are often used as the API or the formulation agent. This review profiles the deep insights that X-ray structural techniques and associated analytical methods can offer in the development of a drug. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Functional (Nano)materials)
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16 pages, 2226 KiB  
Review
Recent Developments in Biomimetic Antifouling Materials: A Review
by Timothy Sullivan and Irene O’Callaghan
Biomimetics 2020, 5(4), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics5040058 - 30 Oct 2020
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 6586
Abstract
The term ‘biomimetic’ might be applied to any material or process that in some way reproduces, mimics, or is otherwise inspired by nature. Also variously termed bionic, bioinspired, biological design, or even green design, the idea of adapting or taking inspiration from a [...] Read more.
The term ‘biomimetic’ might be applied to any material or process that in some way reproduces, mimics, or is otherwise inspired by nature. Also variously termed bionic, bioinspired, biological design, or even green design, the idea of adapting or taking inspiration from a natural solution to solve a modern engineering problem has been of scientific interest since it was first proposed in the 1960s. Since then, the concept that natural materials and nature can provide inspiration for incredible breakthroughs and developments in terms of new technologies and entirely new approaches to solving technological problems has become widely accepted. This is very much evident in the fields of materials science, surface science, and coatings. In this review, we survey recent developments (primarily those within the last decade) in biomimetic approaches to antifouling, self-cleaning, or anti-biofilm technologies. We find that this field continues to mature, and emerging novel, biomimetic technologies are present at multiple stages in the development pipeline, with some becoming commercially available. However, we also note that the rate of commercialization of these technologies appears slow compared to the significant research output within the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomimetic Functional (Nano)materials)
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