Special Issue "Autism and Developmental Disabilities"

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Sayyed Ali Samadi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Nursing and Health Research, Ulster University, BT52 1SA Coleraine, Northern Ireland
Interests: early screening of Autism Spectrum disorders (ASD); ASD diagnosis; cultural aspects of ASD; parental based early intervention; parental impacts of caregiving for a child with ASD
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnoses have grown at a tremendous rate in recent years globally, likely due to growing awareness of the condition, and perhaps other contributing factors. ASD diagnosis and treatment remains a challenge due to different cultural and personal factors. The main current treatments primarily focused on behavioural approaches but there are many other available evidence-based approaches. Because ASD is considered as a lifelong neurodevelopmental condition, significant efforts are being made to investigate it from the different perspective and mainly through multidisciplinary approaches. In this focus issue, we will highlight reviews and research that addresses ASD from different conceptual, cultural, social, medical and technological perspective with the potential to have positive outcomes for families and individuals.

Prof. Dr. Sayyed Ali Samadi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Early screening and diagnosis
  • Gender differences in Autism
  • Cultural aspects of Autism and early parental concerns
  • Changes of concept in Autism
  • Treatment landscape and the future of treatment approaches
  • Digital Technology and its implication in Autism research
  • Developmental window for intervention
  • Literature reviews
  • And other related topics to Autism research

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Caregiver Reports of Screen Time Use of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Qualitative Study
Behav. Sci. 2019, 9(5), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9050056 - 22 May 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3157
Abstract
Screen based media have progressively become an integral part in the daily lives of children and youths with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, research that exclusively pursues the functionality of screen media use of children with ASD is extremely rare. Through [...] Read more.
Screen based media have progressively become an integral part in the daily lives of children and youths with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, research that exclusively pursues the functionality of screen media use of children with ASD is extremely rare. Through a triangulated approach, the present study aims to fill this gap. We conducted 13 interviews with parents of children with ASD and supplemented this interview–study with an online survey including parents of children with ASD (n = 327). Children with ASD mostly used screen media (especially television) for their wellbeing, which is associated with chances and risks. Based on the parental interviews it is suggested that the media usage of children with ASD should be supervised. The results are discussed in terms of their practical implementation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Autism and Developmental Disabilities)
Article
Steroid Metabolites Support Evidence of Autism as a Spectrum
Behav. Sci. 2019, 9(5), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9050052 - 09 May 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2968
Abstract
Objectives: It is common nowadays to refer to autism as a spectrum. Increased evidence of the involvement of steroid metabolites has been shown by the presence of stronger alterations in Kanner’s syndrome compared with Asperger syndrome. Methods: 24 h urine samples [...] Read more.
Objectives: It is common nowadays to refer to autism as a spectrum. Increased evidence of the involvement of steroid metabolites has been shown by the presence of stronger alterations in Kanner’s syndrome compared with Asperger syndrome. Methods: 24 h urine samples were collected from 20 boys with Asperger syndrome, 21 boys with Kanner’s syndrome, and identically sized control groups, each matched for age, weight, and height for comprehensive steroid hormone metabolite analysis via gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results: Higher levels of most steroid metabolites were detected in boys with Kanner’s syndrome and Asperger syndrome compared to their matched controls. These differences were more pronounced in affected individuals with Kanner’s syndrome versus Asperger syndrome. Furthermore, a specific and unique pattern of alteration of androsterone, etiocholanolone, progesterone, tetrahydrocortisone, and tetrahydrocortisol was identified in boys with Kanner’s syndrome and Asperger syndrome. Interestingly, in both matched samples, only androsterone, etiocholanolone, progesterone, tetrahydrocortisone, tetrahydrocortisol, and 5a-tetrahydrocortisol groups were positively correlated. In the Asperger syndrome group, all metabolites showed a positive correlation. In the Kanner’s syndrome group, 5-a tetrahydrocortisol with androsterone showed a positive correlation. Conclusions: Due to differences in the level of alteration, the premise that Asperger syndrome is on the mild side of the autism spectrum and that Kanner’s syndrome is on the severe side is supported, but alteration patterns yield different phenotypic expressions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Autism and Developmental Disabilities)
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Article
The Cognitive Profile of People with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders
Behav. Sci. 2019, 9(2), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9020020 - 20 Feb 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3895
Abstract
Several studies have examined the cognitive profile of people with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (IQ > 70), and its relationship with the symptoms of ASD and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV (WISC-IV). However, no data [...] Read more.
Several studies have examined the cognitive profile of people with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (IQ > 70), and its relationship with the symptoms of ASD and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV (WISC-IV). However, no data exist on the similarities or differences in this profile in less affluent countries. The present study examined the cognitive profile and its relationship with the symptoms of ASD and ADHD in 30 subjects aged 6–16 years with high-functioning ASD and compared the results with those of 30 typically developing (TD) subjects. In line with previous research findings, the WISC-IV cognitive profile analysis of subjects with high-functioning ASD showed a good competence in Matrix Reasoning and weaknesses in Comprehension, but the main distinguishing point was the competence in processing speed in both groups. In the present study, the Verbal Comprehension Index correlated negatively with the communication symptoms, and the Working Memory Index correlated positively with the social symptoms in the ASD group. Given the similarities that exist between the results of the present research and previous studies, it may be concluded that there are similarities in the cognitive profile of individuals with ASD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Autism and Developmental Disabilities)
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