Special Issue "Physician Burnout in Hospitals"

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Rikinkumar S. Patel
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Griffin Memorial Hospital (Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services), Norman, OK 73071, USA
Interests: physician burnout; depression; inpatient psychiatry; hospital outcomes
Dr. Hema Madhuri Mekala
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Griffin Memorial Hospital, Norman, OK 73071, USA
Interests: bipolar; schizophrenia; addiction psychiatry
Dr. Zeeshan Mansuri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Co-chair of the Residents' Research Subcommittee, Texas Tech University Health Science Center, Lubbock, TX 79430, USA
Interests: adult psychiatry; child and adolescent psychiatry; public health; physician burnout; the relationship between medical and psychiatric disorders

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Burnout is a rising problem among American doctors, according to a study published in the December issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The number of physicians who met the criteria for burnout rose from 45 to 54% from 2011 to 2014. Burnout rates increased in nearly all specialties, but the highest rates of burnout were found among doctors working in internal medicine, family medicine, and emergency medicine. Burnout manifests with emotional exhaustion, loss of meaning in work, and feelings of uselessness and is troublesome to the doctors themselves, their patients, their medical profession, and their families.

This Special Issue will explore the existing state of knowledge of physician burnout and its related problems. What do we know about physician burnout? How can we challenge the established organizational functioning in hospitals? Why are physicians at a higher risk of depression and suicide? Is there a stigma associated with the low number of physicians seeking help for burnout? Does burnout cause adverse patient and hospital outcomes due to a decreased work efficiency of the affected doctors?  This Special Issue will address the most recent scientific findings regarding the prevalence, prevention, and challenges of physician burnout in the healthcare system. This is a serious public health problem in the United States. Despite the consideration that this problem receives by the media, little is known about preventive and effective organizational strategies. To conclude, this Special Issue will focus on physician burnout, our current state of knowledge of it, and future directions for reducing it and improving physicians’ well-being and productivity.

Dr. Rikinkumar S. Patel
Dr. Hema Madhuri Mekala
Dr. Zeeshan Mansuri
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physician burnout
  • Work burnout
  • Healthcare system
  • Hospitals
  • Depression
  • Suicide
  • Epidemiology

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Review
Factors Related to Physician Burnout and Its Consequences: A Review
Behav. Sci. 2018, 8(11), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs8110098 - 25 Oct 2018
Cited by 148 | Viewed by 9329
Abstract
Physician burnout is a universal dilemma that is seen in healthcare professionals, particularly physicians, and is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a feeling of low personal accomplishment. In this review, we discuss the contributing factors leading to physician burnout and its consequences [...] Read more.
Physician burnout is a universal dilemma that is seen in healthcare professionals, particularly physicians, and is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a feeling of low personal accomplishment. In this review, we discuss the contributing factors leading to physician burnout and its consequences for the physician’s health, patient outcomes, and the healthcare system. Physicians face daily challenges in providing care to their patients, and burnout may be from increased stress levels in overworked physicians. Additionally, the healthcare system mandates physicians to keep a meticulous record of their physician-patient encounters along with clerical responsibilities. Physicians are not well-trained in managing clerical duties, and this might shift their focus from solely caring for their patients. This can be addressed by the systematic application of evidence-based interventions, including but not limited to group interventions, mindfulness training, assertiveness training, facilitated discussion groups, and promoting a healthy work environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physician Burnout in Hospitals)
Back to TopTop