Designing Culturally Responsive and Inclusive Education Strategies to Support Children, Youth, and Adults in Transition

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Educational Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 3327

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Wheelock College of Education & Human Development, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
Interests: school redesign; individualized learning plans; personalized career and academic plans; social emotional learning; workforce readiness; positive youth development

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Wheelock College of Education & Human Development, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
Interests: college and career readiness; workplace skills; social and emotional learning; financial literacy skills; Individualized Learning Plans; career identity; future readiness

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are inviting papers for a special issue of “Designing culturally responsive and inclusive education strategies to support children, youth, and adults in transition.” It aims to identify and promote effective strategies that are evidence-based and actively engaging important stakeholders at the community and regional levels. The special issue welcomes innovative school and community policy and practice strategies that support transitions through the lifespan. Possible topics in policies include VET/CTE, ILP/personalized learning, employer engagement, and WIOA/IDEA. Possible areas of transition include elementary to middle school, middle to high school, high school to postsecondary education, high school/postsecondary education to the world of work, early to middle, and middle to late career. 

We experience numerous transitions throughout the lifespan. Without access to adequate support and resources, these transitions can result in exiting education and training programs, unemployment, and mental as well as physical health challenges. This Special Issue provides space for innovative interventions and studies that offer ways to effectively prepare and support the access of youth and adults to occupations being shaped by the Fourth Industrial Revolution. We are especially interested in community-based collaboration interventions and research efforts that are shaped, in part, by the individuals being served.

Prof. Dr. Scott Solberg
Dr. Chong Myung Park
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • transition
  • career adaptability
  • translational research
  • community-based action research
  • inclusive education
  • social and emotional learning
  • career identity

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 1521 KiB  
Article
Experiences of Middle School Programming in an Online Learning Environment
by Reem Alebaikan, Hayat Alajlan, Ahmad Almassaad, Norah Alshamri and Yvonne Bain
Behav. Sci. 2022, 12(11), 466; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs12110466 - 21 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2443
Abstract
This small-scale qualitative study aimed to explore learning programming through online experiences among middle school students in a school for girls in Saudi Arabia. The low uptake of computing by girls has been a persistent problem in schools and beyond. In Saudi Arabia, [...] Read more.
This small-scale qualitative study aimed to explore learning programming through online experiences among middle school students in a school for girls in Saudi Arabia. The low uptake of computing by girls has been a persistent problem in schools and beyond. In Saudi Arabia, there are similar issues in encouraging learners and girls in particular to be interested in computer coding. To explore how to engage learners in coding, an informal online course on programming for learners (age 12) was designed using a community-of-inquiry approach and a gamification process enabled through the use of Thunkable™ and TalentLMS™ to engage learners. An inductive qualitative research approach was used to explore influencing factors for engaging learners in programming. The data comprised three individual interviews, one focus group, a teacher’s diary, and a content analysis of the activities recorded in the TalentLMS™ system’s student progress reports. Findings highlighted the need to consider digital learning agency in the online learning environment and that learning programming online was best facilitated through student collaboration using live tools with teacher support to develop the online community. Further, findings revealed the rationale for the girls enrolling in the online programming course, which included improving their online learning skills, planning future careers, and developing résumés. These findings may contribute to offering some insight into pedagogy that can encourage greater interest in computer programming in schools. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop