Special Issue "Current and Future Trends in Personality Psychology"

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 March 2023 | Viewed by 1966

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Danilo Garcia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Promotion of Health and Innovation (PHI) Lab., International Network for Well-Being, 58183 Linköping, Sweden
2. Department of Learning and Social Sciences, Linköping University, 58183 Linköping, Sweden
3. Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health (CELAM), University of Gothenburg, 40530 Gothenburg, Sweden
4. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, 40530 Gothenburg, Sweden
5. Department of Psychology, Lund University, 22100 Lund, Sweden
Interests: well-being; personality; organizational psychology; health and free will from a biopsychosocial perspective

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Human personality has been defined as the dynamic organization, within an individual, of psychobiological systems that modulate adaptation to a changing environment (Cloninger, Svrakic, & Przybeck, 1993). In this context, our ability to learn and adapt is ingrained in our ability to act intentionally and interpret the meaning of what we experience, which in turn allows us to self-regulate our emotional reactions and even our habits (Cloninger, 2004). Therefore, personality is considered a major factor and predictor of people’s health, identity, well-being, decision-making abilities, employability and workability, and etcetera. However, some past research has not only debated if personality is as a real phenomenon or just a byproduct of our brain functions without real impact in our lives, but also if personality is changeable or stable. In this special issue, by conceptualizing personality using different models, researchers are invited to address personality in the context of psychometrics, health psychology, the science of well-being, educational psychology, free will, organizational psychology, and etcetera. The main aim of this special issue is to present current research in personality psychology from different perspectives and to point new directions and innovations in the field of personality psychology.

Prof. Dr. Danilo Garcia
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • personality
  • temperament
  • character
  • Cloninger’s Biopsychosocial Model
  • identity
  • health
  • well-being
  • organizational psychology
  • psychometrics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Are Perfectionists Always Dissatisfied with Life? An Empirical Study from the Perspective of Self-Determination Theory and Perceived Control
Behav. Sci. 2022, 12(11), 440; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs12110440 - 10 Nov 2022
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Abstract
Compared to non-perfectionists, perfectionists may not be satisfied with the growing needs in their lives to the same extent. To test whether perfectionists are dissatisfied with their lives, we investigated whether trait perfectionism attenuates the relationship between basic psychological needs, perceived control, and [...] Read more.
Compared to non-perfectionists, perfectionists may not be satisfied with the growing needs in their lives to the same extent. To test whether perfectionists are dissatisfied with their lives, we investigated whether trait perfectionism attenuates the relationship between basic psychological needs, perceived control, and life satisfaction. A total of 574 college students self-reported basic psychological needs, perceived control, life satisfaction, and perfectionistic strivings and concerns, with a mean age of 19.53 (SD = 1.61), including 299 women and 275 men. A correlation analysis showed that perfectionistic strivings were significantly positively related to life satisfaction, while perfectionistic concerns were significantly negatively related to life satisfaction. The moderation analysis showed that perfectionistic strivings not only moderated the relationship between basic psychological needs and life satisfaction but also moderated the relationship between perceived control and life satisfaction. Individuals with high perfectionistic strivings generally reported high levels of life satisfaction. Perfectionistic strivings, however, reduced the positive relationship between perceived control and life satisfaction. Perfectionistic concerns moderated the relationship between perceived control and life satisfaction—the higher the perfectionistic concerns, the weaker the positive relationship between perceived control and life satisfaction. The study found that individuals with high perfectionistic tendencies are not always dissatisfied with life, but that perfectionism weakens the relationship between basic psychological needs, perceived control, and life satisfaction. We argue that one way to improve happiness is by coaching individuals who are highly perfectionistic to become self-aware of their personality so both their perfectionistic strivings and concerns are more coherent with their values and goals or character. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current and Future Trends in Personality Psychology)
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Article
General Factor of Personality and Its Relationship with the Dark Triad and Social Intelligence in Slovenian Adolescents
Behav. Sci. 2022, 12(9), 310; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs12090310 - 27 Aug 2022
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Abstract
The general factor of personality (GFP) represents the shared variance between personality traits that yield social adjustment and acts as a core personality disposition. In the present study, the existence of GFP in a sample of 249 Slovenian adolescents aged 15–19 years was [...] Read more.
The general factor of personality (GFP) represents the shared variance between personality traits that yield social adjustment and acts as a core personality disposition. In the present study, the existence of GFP in a sample of 249 Slovenian adolescents aged 15–19 years was investigated, and the relationship between GFP, the Dark Triad, and social intelligence was researched. The study used three self-report questionnaires to measure the Big Five, the Dark Triad, and three dimensions of social intelligence. It was found that, in adolescents, GFP exists (although in a somewhat different composition than in previous studies) and is negatively correlated with Machiavellianism and psychopathy and positively correlated with social skills and social awareness. GFP acts as a significant positive predictor of all social intelligence dimensions, and Machiavellianism acts as a significant positive predictor of social information processing and social skills. It can be concluded that GFP and, to a certain extent, perhaps some manipulative tendencies positively predict how an individual functions in society. With these findings, the study contributes to the understanding of the (hierarchical) structure of personality and its association with behavior in social interactions, which is one of the most important developmental tasks in adolescence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current and Future Trends in Personality Psychology)
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