Special Issue "Applications of Cold-Atom-Based Quantum Technology"

A special issue of Atoms (ISSN 2218-2004). This special issue belongs to the section "Atom Based Quantum Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2022 | Viewed by 2674

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jamie Vovrosh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
Interests: quantum technology; atom interferometry; gravity sensing
Dr. Yu-Hung Lien
E-Mail
Guest Editor
School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
Interests: quantum technology; atom interferometry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Quantum technologies based on the use of cold atoms are rapidly advancing in their technical maturity. Quantum sensors have, in many cases, surpassed their classical counterparts in terms of precision achieved in the laboratory. Currently, experimental prototypes are leaving the lab, and commercial products are emerging in the field of atomic clocks and gravity sensors. However, there are still technological challenges to be overcome in order for the full benefits of quantum technology to be realized in a full range of competitive commercial products. Furthermore, techniques and technologies for future SWaP reduction, improved robustness, and increased sensitivity are currently under development and provide exciting perspectives for future performance over the current state of the art.

This Special Issue aims to bring together state-of-the-art research and development contributions that address the technological and research challenges in atom-based quantum technologies. Topics of primary interest include but are not limited to matterwave interferometers for inertial measurements, atomic and optical clocks, atomic magnetometers, etc.

In this Special Issue, we solicit review articles, original research papers, perspectives, and short communications covering all aspects of atom-based quantum sensors including technical implementation, advances in component level technology, modelling, quantum enhancements, technology roadmaps, and demonstrations of cold atom systems in different applications or environments. Submissions should clearly indicate which open challenges in quantum sensors the work is addressing. Authors are encouraged to contact the guest editors prior to submission if they are uncertain whether their work falls within the general scope of this Special Issue.

Dr. Jamie Vovrosh
Dr. Yu-Hung Lien
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atoms is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • quantum technology
  • quantum sensors
  • metrology
  • quantum clocks
  • quantum computing
  • cold atoms

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Applications of Cold-Atom-Based Quantum Technology
Atoms 2022, 10(1), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/atoms10010030 - 09 Mar 2022
Viewed by 858
Abstract
Cold-atom systems are rapidly advancing in technical maturity and have, in many cases, surpassed their classical counterparts, becoming a versatile tool that is used in a variety of fundamental research applications [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Cold-Atom-Based Quantum Technology)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Article
Demonstration of a Compact Magneto-Optical Trap on an Unstaffed Aerial Vehicle
Atoms 2022, 10(1), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/atoms10010032 - 17 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1188
Abstract
The extraordinary performance offered by cold atom-based clocks and sensors has the opportunity to profoundly affect a range of applications, for example in gravity surveys, enabling long term monitoring applications through low drift measurements. While ground-based devices are already starting to enter the [...] Read more.
The extraordinary performance offered by cold atom-based clocks and sensors has the opportunity to profoundly affect a range of applications, for example in gravity surveys, enabling long term monitoring applications through low drift measurements. While ground-based devices are already starting to enter the commercial market, significant improvements in robustness and reductions to size, weight, and power are required for such devices to be deployed by Unstaffed Aerial Vehicle systems (UAV). In this article, we realise the first step towards the deployment of cold atom based clocks and sensors on UAV’s by demonstrating an UAV portable magneto-optical trap system, the core package of cold atom based systems. This system is able to generate clouds of 2.1±0.2×107 atoms, in a package of 370 mm × 350 mm × 100 mm, weighing 6.56 kg, consuming 80 W of power. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Cold-Atom-Based Quantum Technology)
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