Special Issue "Tourism Climatology: Past, Present and Future"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Biometeorology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. M. Belén Gómez Martín
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, University of Barcelona, C/Montalegre, 6, 08001 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: geography; tourism climatology; tourism and recreation; global environmental change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In spite of the economic, political and social problems that have complicated the tourism business in certain resorts and destinations in recent years, in general terms tourism is a sector with continual growth that acts as an important engine of development at a worldwide level.

Climate and weather are fundamental factors for tourism development. However, the leisure and travel sector is itself an intensive emitter of large amounts of CO2 and other greenhouse gases, and as such is an important modifier of climate conditions that can have negative effects on the future of this sector.

In this Special Issue we welcome articles that tackle the scientific challenges arising in the field of tourism climatology, given the bidirectional relationship between leisure and recreational activities and the climate. We will consider theoretical and conceptual reflections on this issue, methodological contributions and case studies relating amongst other things to the evaluation of the potential of climate resources for different types of tourism and segments of demand; the necessary consideration of climate in the organization and planning of tourism due to its links to key aspects for the sector such as water supply, artificial snow production and energy costs, among others; the repercussions of extreme meteorological phenomena on the safety of tourist destinations; the importance of providing climate and meteorological information adapted to different uses and needs to enable tourist activities to be carried out as well as possible; the direct and indirect impacts of climate change on the sector and the challenges arising in terms of the adaptation to and mitigation of this phenomenon.

Dr. M. Belén Gómez Martín
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Tourism–climate system
  • Climatic resources for tourism
  • Climatic/weather preferences of tourists
  • Climate/weather and tourist behavior
  • Methods to evaluate the tourist potential of the climate
  • Extreme atmospheric events and tourism
  • Climate and weather information for tourism
  • Climate services for tourism
  • Climate change impacts and mitigation/adaptation in tourism

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Climate Preferences for Tourism: Perceptions Regarding Ideal and Unfavourable Conditions for Hiking in Spain
Atmosphere 2019, 10(11), 646; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10110646 - 25 Oct 2019
Abstract
Physical activity is an increasingly frequent part of our leisure time. Within this context, hiking is a popular form of tourism which has a positive impact on the quality of life. In spite of the importance of climate conditions for this recreational activity, [...] Read more.
Physical activity is an increasingly frequent part of our leisure time. Within this context, hiking is a popular form of tourism which has a positive impact on the quality of life. In spite of the importance of climate conditions for this recreational activity, relatively little research has been done on hiking from the perspective of climate and tourism. With this in mind in this paper we make the first detailed extensive assessment of climate preferences for the practice of hiking tourism in Spain. To this end a review of the theoretical/methodological body of literature on tourism climatology was conducted together with a survey aimed at evaluating the stated climate preferences of hiking tourists. The results are offered within the framework of international research on climate preferences for a range of tourism activities. The comparative analysis of these results with regard to those obtained in previous research highlights various similarities but also certain factors specific to hiking in Spain. Overall, the climate preferences of hiking tourists are similar to those of other segments of the tourism market in terms of the aesthetic and physical aspects of the climate, although they also have certain specific preferences as regards thermal aspects, especially regarding the optimal daily thermal conditions for hiking. The results obtained are useful for assessing the suitability of the climate for the practice of hiking tourism in Spain and for promoting proper management and planning of this leisure activity in tourist destinations, including the development of climate calendars detailing the most suitable times of the year for hiking at these destinations. These issues will be addressed in future research studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tourism Climatology: Past, Present and Future)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Present and Future Climate—Tourism Conditions in Milos Island, Greece
Atmosphere 2019, 10(3), 145; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10030145 - 18 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The objective of this study is to analyze the present and future climate-tourism conditions in Milos Island, Cyclades, Greece, by means of the assessment of the three climate components (physical, thermal, and aesthetic), which interprets the so-called climatic tourism potential. Milos Island is [...] Read more.
The objective of this study is to analyze the present and future climate-tourism conditions in Milos Island, Cyclades, Greece, by means of the assessment of the three climate components (physical, thermal, and aesthetic), which interprets the so-called climatic tourism potential. Milos Island is chosen as a representative island of the Cyclades complex in the Aegean Sea. Future climate change conditions are analyzed using the high-resolution simulations (grid size 0.11° × 0.11°) of the Regional Climate Model ALADIN 5.2 from Centre National de Recherche Meteorologiques, Meteo France (CNRM). The climate simulations concern the future periods 2021–2050 and 2071–2100 against the reference period 1961–1990, under two Representative Concentration Pathways, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. Based on regional climate simulations, the tourism potential can be described in a meaningful and simple way by applying the Climate-Tourism-Information-Scheme (CTIS), which depicts detailed climate information that could be used by tourists to foresee the thermal comfort, aesthetic, and physical conditions for planning their vacations. More specifically, the thermal climate component is interpreted by the Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET), which is one of the most popular physiological thermal indices based on the human energy balance. The findings of the analysis could be used by stakeholders and the tourism industry in decision-making regarding the destination of Milos for tourism planning and touristic infrastructure development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tourism Climatology: Past, Present and Future)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Progress and Prospects of Tourism Climate Research in China
Atmosphere 2019, 10(11), 701; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10110701 - 13 Nov 2019
Abstract
Tourism climate research is of great significance to the tourism industry because tourism is closely linked to climate. Based on an analysis of related core papers, this paper reviews the research progress on tourism climate in China in terms of research method, research [...] Read more.
Tourism climate research is of great significance to the tourism industry because tourism is closely linked to climate. Based on an analysis of related core papers, this paper reviews the research progress on tourism climate in China in terms of research method, research process, and research topic. Research on tourism climate in China started later than similar research in some Western countries and the topics mainly focused on tourism climate resources, climate comfort for tourism, the impact of climate on tourists’ behavior and emotion, climate and tourism seasonality, climate change and tourism development, etc. To provide scientific support for the sustainable development of China’s tourism industry, we propose the following for future research, based on our review of the literature: (1) strengthening the theoretical study of tourism climatology, (2) constructing and improving the research content system, and (3) enriching relevant research in climate-sensitive areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tourism Climatology: Past, Present and Future)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop