Special Issue "Long Term Trends of Air Pollutants"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Air Quality".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 July 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Zoë Fleming Website E-Mail
National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS), Leeds, UK; Centre for Climate and Resilience Research (CR)2, Santiago, Chile

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Trace gas monitoring stations allow us to monitor changes in air pollution in our cities, rural areas, and even high mountaintop sites. Comprehensive monitoring networks in Europe and North America provide up to 40 years of long term timeseries of various trace gases. In other areas of the world, the data sets do not go back as far and, in some countries, there are no networks, but there is a variety of stations that can provide us with a clear picture of how air pollutants have changed over the years. We are interested in any long term monitoring of air pollutants, from just over five years for so-called "changes" to the scale where we can talk about trends (over ten years). O3, NO2, CO, SO2, aerosols, PM2.5 trends, and any linkages between these various pollutants are of interest. Any changes in indoor pollution and linkages to building design, lifestyle, and outdoor pollution would also be of interest.

Illustrating trends in air pollution at one station must involve describing the regional and global contexts and taking into account the nearest pollution sources. Studies of regional or even global trends will involve combining individual station trends to derive or describe regional trends. The statistical analysis involved in deriving the trends will need to be well described and justified.

In this Special Issue, manuscripts on all aspects of the analysis and interpretation of changes and trends in air pollutants are welcome.

Dr. Zoë Fleming
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Trends
  • Ozone
  • NO2
  • Particulate Matter
  • Long-range transport
  • Statistical significance of trends
  • Chemical composition
  • Urban air quality
  • Health effects
  • Emission reductions

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Spatial–Temporal Variation of Tropospheric NO2 over China during 2005 to 2018
Atmosphere 2019, 10(8), 444; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10080444 - 01 Aug 2019
Abstract
In recent years, new and strict air quality regulations have been implemented in China. Therefore, it is of great significance to evaluate the current air pollution situation and effectiveness of actions. In this study, Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite data were used to [...] Read more.
In recent years, new and strict air quality regulations have been implemented in China. Therefore, it is of great significance to evaluate the current air pollution situation and effectiveness of actions. In this study, Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite data were used to detect the spatiotemporal characteristics of tropospheric NO2 columns over China from 2005 to 2018, including spatial distribution, seasonal cycles and long-term trends. The averaged NO2 pollution is higher in southeastern China and lower in the northwest, which are well delineated by the Heihe–Tengchong line. Furthermore, the NO2 loadings are highest in the North China Plain, with vertical column density (VCD) exceeding 13 × 1015 molec cm−2. Regarding the seasonal cycle, the NO2 loadings in eastern China is highest in winter and lowest in summer, while the western region shows the opposite feature. The amplitude of annual range increase gradually from the south to the north. If the entire period of 2005–2018 is taken into account, China has experienced little change in NO2. In fact, however, there appears to be significant trends of an increase followed by a downward tendency, with the turning point in the year 2012. In the former episode of 2005–2012, increasing trends overwhelm nearly the whole nation, especially in the Jing–Jin–Tang region, Shandong Province, and Northern Henan and Southern Hebei combined regions, where the rising rates were as high as 1.0–1.8 × 1015 molec cm−2 year−1. In contrast, the latter episode of 2013–2018 features remarkable declines in NO2 columns over China. Particularly, the regions where the decreased degree was remarkable in 2013–2018 were consistent with the regions where the upward trend was obvious in 2005–2012. Overall, this upward–downward pattern is true for most parts of China. However, some of the largest metropolises, such as Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou, witnessed a continuous decrease in the NO2 amounts, indicating earlier and more stringent measures adopted in these areas. Finally, it can be concluded that China’s recent efforts to cut NO2 pollution are successful, especially in mega cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Long Term Trends of Air Pollutants)
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Open AccessArticle
Changes in the Relationship between Particulate Matter and Surface Temperature in Seoul from 2002–2017
Atmosphere 2019, 10(5), 238; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10050238 - 01 May 2019
Abstract
This study focuses on the changes over time in the relationship between surface temperature and particulate matter (PM) concentration over Seoul using long-term observational data. Correlation coefficients between the daily mean PM10 concentration and surface temperature were calculated to investigate the relationship [...] Read more.
This study focuses on the changes over time in the relationship between surface temperature and particulate matter (PM) concentration over Seoul using long-term observational data. Correlation coefficients between the daily mean PM10 concentration and surface temperature were calculated to investigate the relationship between the two. The PM10 and temperature displayed a strong positive correlation, suggesting the increase in PM was driven by large-scale synoptic patterns accompanying such high temperatures. It was found that the correlation coefficient in 2002–2009 was significantly higher than that of 2010–2017, indicating that the relationship between PM10 concentration and temperature has weakened over time in recent decades. Correlation coefficients between daily averaged temperature and the PM10 of each year were calculated to account for the decreased correlation in the most recent decade. We found that the correlation coefficients between surface temperature and PM of each year exhibited a clear negative correlation with the longitudinal position of the Siberian High, suggesting that the position of the Siberian High might affect the strength of the relationship between PM concentration and temperature over Seoul. We also found that the eastward shift of the Siberian High reduces the standard deviation of pressure over Seoul, indicating reduction of synoptic perturbation. These results imply that the eastward shift of the Siberian High in recent decades might weaken the relationship between the PM and surface temperature over Seoul. This study suggests that the relationship between PM and meteorological variables is changing over time through changes in large climate variability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Long Term Trends of Air Pollutants)
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Open AccessArticle
Long-Term Observed Visibility in Eastern Thailand: Temporal Variation, Association with Air Pollutants and Meteorological Factors, and Trends
Atmosphere 2019, 10(3), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10030122 - 06 Mar 2019
Abstract
The present study analyzed long-term observed visibility over Eastern Thailand, with a focus on urbanized/highly industrialized coastal areas. The temporal coverage spans 9 to 35 years for visibility data and 9 to 15 years for air quality data for the selected stations. Visibility [...] Read more.
The present study analyzed long-term observed visibility over Eastern Thailand, with a focus on urbanized/highly industrialized coastal areas. The temporal coverage spans 9 to 35 years for visibility data and 9 to 15 years for air quality data for the selected stations. Visibility shows strong seasonality and its degradation intensifies in the dry season. It shows a negative correspondence with PM10 and relative humidity, which is evident from different methods. Visibility has strong dependence on wind direction, suggesting the influence of local pollution sources. Back-trajectory results suggest important influences of long-range transport and humidity. Secondary aerosol formation has the potential to aggravate visibility based on a precursor-ratio method. The trends in average visibility at most stations in recent years show negative shift, decreasing direction, or persistence of relatively low visibility, possibly due to increase in air pollution. Contrast was found in the meteorologically adjusted trend (based on generalized linear models) in visibility and PM10, which is partly attributed to the role of fine particles. The study suggests that visibility degradation is a problem in Eastern Thailand and is affected by both air pollutants and meteorology. The study hopes to get attention from policymakers regarding issue of visibility degradation in the region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Long Term Trends of Air Pollutants)
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