Special Issue "Roadside Air Pollution"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Air Quality".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Kyung-Hwan Kwak
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Korea
Interests: urban air pollution; urban meteorology; on-road measurement; mobile monitoring; CFD modeling; vehicle exhaust emission; NOx–O3–VOC chemistry; aerosol dynamics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Roadside air pollution is closely related with human health. In roadside environments, people are easily exposed to harmful pollutants such as nanoparticles, black carbon (BC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and nitrogen oxides (NOx). As diesel engine exhaust was classified as “carcinogenic to humans” (IARC, 2012), we have been making a great effort to regulate vehicle exhaust emissions over the world. In addition, non-exhaust emission from road dust resuspension and tire and brake wear is another concern. To solve this, real-world monitoring and modeling in roadside environments are necessary, because elevated air pollution levels are generally localized phenomena. We invite you to consider submitting your research for publication in this Special Issue of the journal, focusing on “Roadside Air Pollution”. The aim of this Special Issue is to report and review recent achievements on relevant topics including on-road measurement, mobile monitoring, atmospheric dispersion using a CFD model, vehicle exhaust emission, aerosol dynamics in near-road environments, NOx–O3–VOCs chemistry, effects of buildings and trees on roadside air quality, roadside exposure assessment, etc.

Prof. Dr. Kyung-Hwan Kwak
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vehicle exhaust
  • traffic composition
  • nanoparticles
  • aerosols
  • NO2/NOx ratio
  • atmospheric dispersion
  • street canyon
  • road intersection
  • modeling and monitoring
  • exposure assessment

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Transient Characterization of Automotive Exhaust Emission from Different Vehicle Types Based on On-Road Measurements
Atmosphere 2020, 11(1), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11010064 - 03 Jan 2020
Abstract
Previous works on real-world vehicle emission characteristics have mainly focused on the influences of fuel, speed, vehicle type, elevation, and other factors on vehicle emission quantity and components. However, few studies have investigated the transient trend of automotive exhaust emissions through on-road measurements. [...] Read more.
Previous works on real-world vehicle emission characteristics have mainly focused on the influences of fuel, speed, vehicle type, elevation, and other factors on vehicle emission quantity and components. However, few studies have investigated the transient trend of automotive exhaust emissions through on-road measurements. The key objective of the present paper was to examine the transient characteristics of exhaust emissions from different vehicle types on the roads of Tianjin. To achieve the goal, a portable emission measurement system (PEMS) was employed to monitor emissions from selected test vehicles—private cars, passenger vehicles, and cargo vehicles. It was found that the high-emission points of test vehicles were mainly distributed in two regions: the high-speed region (speed > 70–90 km/h, vehicle-specific power (VSP) > 0 kW/t) and the medium-speed–acceleration region (20–30 km/h < speed < 60–90 km/h, 0 kW/t <VSP < 12 kW/t). The CO, hydrocarbon (HC), NOx, and particulate number (PN) average emission rates in the high-emission points could be 3.15–14.93 times, 1.93–24.89 times, 3.23–6.03 times, and 3.22–30.27 times of those of average emission rates. The HC, NOx, and PN average emission rates of China IV vehicles in the high-emission points were 2.46–4.92 times, 3.56–6.03 times, and 3.22–13.21 times of those of average emission rates, not less than those of China III (1.93–2.52 times, 2.75–3.90 times, and 9.98–22.34 times). Test vehicles mainly emitted nucleation-mode and Aitken-mode particles, and the increase of the PN concentration emission rate in low-speed and high-speed regions was higher than that in the medium-speed region. The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) + diesel particulate filter (DPF) could effectively inhibit the Aitken output caused by turbocharged intercooler (CIC). The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) might cause more nucleation-mode particles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Roadside Air Pollution)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Physical Characterization of Brake-Wear Particles in a PM10 Dilution Tunnel
Atmosphere 2019, 10(11), 639; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10110639 - 23 Oct 2019
Abstract
A dilution tunnel was designed for the characterization of brake-wear particle emissions up to 10 μm on a brake dyno. The particulate matter emission levels from a single front brake were found to be 4.5 mg/km (1.5 mg/km being smaller than 2.5 μm) [...] Read more.
A dilution tunnel was designed for the characterization of brake-wear particle emissions up to 10 μm on a brake dyno. The particulate matter emission levels from a single front brake were found to be 4.5 mg/km (1.5 mg/km being smaller than 2.5 μm) over a novel real-world brake cycle, for a commercial Economic Commission for Europe (ECE) pad. Particle Number (PN) emissions as defined in exhaust regulations were in the order of 1.5 to 6 × 109 particles per km per brake (#/km/brake). Concentration levels could exceed the linearity range of full-flow Condensation Particle Counters (CPCs) over specific braking events, but remained at background levels for 60% of the cycle. Similar concentrations measured with condensation and optical counters suggesting that the majority of emitted particles were larger the 300 nm. Application of higher braking pressures resulted in elevated PN emissions and the systematic formation of nano-sized particles that were thermally stable at 350 °C. Volatile particles were observed only during successive harsh braking events leading to elevated temperatures. The onset depended on the type of brakes and their prehistory, but always at relatively high disc temperatures (280 to 490 °C). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Roadside Air Pollution)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop