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Open AccessArticle

Measuring on-Road Vehicle Hot Running NOx Emissions with a Combined Remote Sensing–Dynamometer Study

by Robin Smit 1,2,* and Daniel Kennedy 3,4
1
Department of Environment and Science, GPO Box 2454, Queensland Government, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia
2
Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia
3
Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia
4
ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematical and Statistical Frontiers (ACEMS), Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2020, 11(3), 294; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11030294
Received: 11 February 2020 / Revised: 4 March 2020 / Accepted: 10 March 2020 / Published: 16 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Roadside Air Pollution)
This study explores the correlation in measured hot running NO/CO2 ratios by a remote sensing device (RSD) and dynamometer testing. Two large diesel cars (E4/E5) are tested on the dynamometer in hot running conditions using a new drive cycle developed for this study and then driven multiple times past the RSD. A number of verification and correction steps are conducted for both the dynamometer and RSD data. A new time resolution adjustment of RSD acceleration values proves important. Comparison of RSD and dynamometer data consistently shows a strong weighted correlation varying from +0.89 to +0.95, despite the high level of variability observed in the RSD measurements. This provides further evidence that relative changes in mean NO/CO2 ratios as measured with the RSD should provide robust emissions data for trend analysis studies and as inputs for regional emissions models. However, a positive bias of approximately 25 ppm NO/% CO2 is observed for the RSD, and bias correction of RSD measurements should be considered pending further testing. View Full-Text
Keywords: remote sensing; on road; emission; dynamometer; NOx; NO2; NO; hot running; CO2; humidity remote sensing; on road; emission; dynamometer; NOx; NO2; NO; hot running; CO2; humidity
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Smit, R.; Kennedy, D. Measuring on-Road Vehicle Hot Running NOx Emissions with a Combined Remote Sensing–Dynamometer Study. Atmosphere 2020, 11, 294.

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