Special Issue "Characteristics of Coastal Low Level Wind Jet"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Meteorology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. William David Cabos Narvaez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics and Mathematics, Universidad de Alcalá, 28801-Alcalá de Henares (Madrid), Spain
Interests: ocean-atmosphere coupling; climate modeling; climate change
Prof. Dr. Pedro M. M. Soares
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto Dom Luiz, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: climate change; atmosphere-land-ocean processes and extremes; coastal low-level jet; climate modeling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The impact of the future evolution of coastal low-level jets (CLLJs) on the marine ecosystems and associated inland areas is a crucial environmental issue. CLLJs are associated with semi-permanent ocean high-pressure systems, and frequently enhanced by the presence of an inland thermal low and by complex local land-ocean-atmosphere interaction processes. They often prompt coastal upwelling in narrow coastal regions that intensifies the thermal contrast and feedbacks positively for the coastal-parallel wind. The physical mechanisms involved in the generation of CLLJs include complex regional and large-scale, basin-wide, atmosphere–ocean and atmosphere–land interactions. Besides, land–ocean temperature contrasts and coastal geomorphology also play important roles. Therefore, an improved understanding of the CLLJs would lead to a better understanding of the climate signal in these regions. From the modeling point of view, these studies require high resolution both for the ocean and the atmosphere, and an explicit simulation of ocean–atmospheric coupling is strongly desirable. We invite contributions with both observational and modeling studies, with global and regional models, which could help to improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the behavior of coastal low-level jets and provide a more robust assessment of their evolution in the future climate.

Prof. Dr. William David Cabos Narvaez
Prof. Dr. Pedro M. M. Soares
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • coastal low-level jets
  • ocean–atmosphere–land coupling
  • coastal upwelling systems
  • inland low-pressure systems
  • high-resolution climate modeling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Recent Changes in the Low-Level Jet along the Subtropical West Coast of South America
Atmosphere 2021, 12(4), 465; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12040465 - 08 Apr 2021
Viewed by 306
Abstract
Surface winds along the subtropical west coast of South America are characterized by the quasi-weekly occurrences of low-level jet events. These short lived but intense wind events impact the coastal ocean environment. Hence, identifying long-term trends in the coastal low-level jet (CLLJ) is [...] Read more.
Surface winds along the subtropical west coast of South America are characterized by the quasi-weekly occurrences of low-level jet events. These short lived but intense wind events impact the coastal ocean environment. Hence, identifying long-term trends in the coastal low-level jet (CLLJ) is essential for understanding changes in marine ecosystems. Here we use ERA5 reanalysis (1979–2019) and an objective algorithm to track anticyclones to investigate recent changes in CLLJ events off central Chile (25–43 °S). Results present evidence that the number of days with intense wind (≥10 ms−1), and the number and duration of CLLJ events have significantly changed off central Chile in recent decades. There is an increase in the number of CLLJ events in the whole study area during winter (June-July-August; JJA), while during summer (December–January–February; DJF) a decrease is observed at lower latitudes (29–34 °S), and an increase is found at the southern boundary of the Humboldt system. We suggest that changes in the central pressures and frequency of extratropical, migratory anticyclones that reach the coast of South America, which force CLLJs, have played an important role in the recent CLLJ changes observed in this region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Characteristics of Coastal Low Level Wind Jet)
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Open AccessArticle
On the Relationship of a Low-Level Jet and the Formation of a Heavy-Rainfall-Producing Mesoscale Vortex over the Yangtze River Basin
Atmosphere 2021, 12(2), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12020156 - 26 Jan 2021
Viewed by 324
Abstract
Dabie vortices (DBVs) are a type of heavy-rainfall-producing mesoscale vortices that appear with a high frequency around the Dabie Mountain over the Yangtze River Basin. For a long time, scholars have found that DBVs tend to form when a low-level jet (LLJ) appears [...] Read more.
Dabie vortices (DBVs) are a type of heavy-rainfall-producing mesoscale vortices that appear with a high frequency around the Dabie Mountain over the Yangtze River Basin. For a long time, scholars have found that DBVs tend to form when a low-level jet (LLJ) appears in their neighboring regions. However, the underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon still remain vague. This study furthers the understanding of this type of event by conducting detailed analyses on a long-lived eastward-moving DBV that caused a severe flood in the 2020 summer. It is found that the LLJ in this event was belonged to a nocturnal LLJ type, with its maximum/minimum appeared around 2100/0600 UTC. The diurnal cycle of LLJ affected precipitation and intensity of the DBV notably: As the LLJ intensified, vortex’s precipitation and intensity both enhanced, and vice versa. The LLJ exerted two effects on the DBV’s formation that are opposite to each other. The more important effect is that the LLJ caused intense lower-level convergence around its northern terminus. This convergence directly produced cyclonic vorticity through vertical stretching, which dominates the DBV’s formation and enhances the convection-related upward cyclonic vorticity transport that acted as another favorable factor. The less important effect is that (i) the LLJ induced import of anticyclonic vorticity into the vortex’s central region, which decelerated the DBV’s formation; and (ii) the LLJ-related to strong ascending motions tilted horizontal vorticity into negative vertical vorticity, which reduced the growth rate of cyclonic vorticity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Characteristics of Coastal Low Level Wind Jet)
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