Applications of Molecularly Imprinted Films

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical and Molecular Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 September 2021) | Viewed by 12149

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Guest Editor
Leader of Team 1, The National Institute for Research & Development in Chemistry and Petrochemistry—ICECHIM, 060021 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: molecularly imprinted polymers; synthesis by polymerization or phase inversion; obtaining films and membranes; sol–gel reactions; covalent immobilization of enzymes on polymers; polymer nanocomposites; hybrid inorganic–organic nanocomposites; acrylic hydrogels and hybrid natural–synthetic hydrogels; biosensors for various pollutants, for explosives and for drug monitoring; polyurethane synthesis; spinning and foaming; PET wastes recovery; recycling of polystyrene waste packages
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently developed modern technologies create an important task for researchers: to find selective materials for different substances. In order to improve selectivity and retention capacity, a new class of polymer materials has been developed, namely, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The most common definition for this new class is that they are a polymer with voids with size, shape, and electronic environment complementary to the molecule used for their imprinting, known as the template. To understand the principle for obtaining the new material, imagine a coin being pushed in plasticine. After taking out the coin, a trace remains in plasticine, having the size and the shape of the face of the coin that was pushed in. If one does the same with a molecule in a polymer matrix, an MIP is obtained, but at a molecular scale. In order to keep these voids unchanged after the extraction of the template, a very high degree of crosslinking or other structure stabilization methods is needed. Two kinds of preparation methods for MIPs have been developed: chemical methods, typically including polymerization (bulk, suspension, emulsion, precipitation, etc.) or sol–gel reactions and physical methods, referring mostly to phase inversion and which are more rarely used. MIP materials can have different shapes, such as irregulate particles, beads, pearls, hydrogels, membranes, and films. Due to the need for different applications, the last category, namely, membranes and films, has been developing at a very fast rate. The application of these new materials refers mostly to the purification of a liquid, the separation of a substance from a complex mixture, analysis, and sensing, but other applications are studied as well, such as catalysis or slow release of bioactive substances, explaining the need for this Special Issue of Applied Science. I am inviting you to publish your work in this issue and look forward to your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Andrei Sarbu
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • molecularly imprinted polymers
  • ion imprinted polymers
  • film
  • membrane
  • polymerization
  • sol–gel
  • phase inversion
  • solid phase extraction
  • sensing
  • slow release

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 191 KiB  
Editorial
Special Issue on the Applications of Molecularly Imprinted Films
by Andrei Sarbu
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(17), 8533; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12178533 - 26 Aug 2022
Viewed by 837
Abstract
Modern separation science and technology require the development of new materials with enhanced properties that are able to separate a substance from complex matrices [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Molecularly Imprinted Films)

Research

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14 pages, 1552 KiB  
Article
Potentiometric Biosensor Based on Artificial Antibodies for an Alzheimer Biomarker Detection
by Sónia Claúdia Ribeiro, Rúben Fernandes, Felismina T. C. Moreira and Maria Goreti Ferreira Sales
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(7), 3625; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12073625 - 2 Apr 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2391
Abstract
This paper presents a potentiometric biosensor for the detection of amyloid β-42 (Aβ-42) in point-of-care analysis. This approach is based on the molecular imprint polymer (MIP) technique, which uses covalently immobilised Aβ-42 to create specific detection cavities on the surface of single-walled carbon [...] Read more.
This paper presents a potentiometric biosensor for the detection of amyloid β-42 (Aβ-42) in point-of-care analysis. This approach is based on the molecular imprint polymer (MIP) technique, which uses covalently immobilised Aβ-42 to create specific detection cavities on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The biosensor was prepared by binding Aβ-42 to the SWCNT surface and then imprinting it by adding acrylamide (monomer), N,N′-methylene-bis-acrylamide (crosslinker) and ammonium persulphate (initiator). The target peptide was removed from the polymer matrix by the proteolytic action of an enzyme (proteinase K). The presence of imprinting sites was confirmed by comparing a MIP-modified surface with a negative control (NIP) consisting of a similar material where the target molecule had been removed from the process. The ability of the sensing material to rebind Aβ-42 was demonstrated by incorporating the MIP material as an electroactive compound in a PVC/plasticiser mixture applied to a solid conductive support of graphite. All steps of the synthesis of the imprinted materials were followed by Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The analytical performance was evaluated by potentiometric transduction, and the MIP material showed cationic slopes of 75 mV-decade−1 in buffer pH 8.0 and a detection limit of 0.72 μg/mL. Overall, potentiometric transduction confirmed that the sensor can discriminate Aβ-42 in the presence of other biomolecules in the same solution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Molecularly Imprinted Films)
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25 pages, 33986 KiB  
Article
Adsorptive Recovery of Cu2+ from Aqueous Solution by Polyethylene Terephthalate Nanofibres Modified with 2-(Aminomethyl)Pyridine
by Thandiwe Crystal Totito, Katri Laatikainen, Omoniyi Pereao, Chris Bode-Aluko and Leslie Petrik
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(24), 11912; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112411912 - 15 Dec 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2247
Abstract
The accumulation of plastic waste products in the environment has adversely affected wildlife and human beings. Common plastics that accumulate in the environment are plastics that are made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) polymer. PET plastic waste products can be recycled for beneficial use, [...] Read more.
The accumulation of plastic waste products in the environment has adversely affected wildlife and human beings. Common plastics that accumulate in the environment are plastics that are made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) polymer. PET plastic waste products can be recycled for beneficial use, which would reduce their negative impacts. In this study, modified PET or waste PET (WPET) from plastic bottles was blended with powder commercial 2-(aminomethyl)pyridine (SiAMPy) resin and electrospun into composite nanofibres and applied for Cu2+ adsorption. PET-SiAMPy or WPET-SiAMPy composite nanofibres fibre diameters from the HRSEM images were 90–140 nm and 110–155 nm, respectively. In batch adsorption experiments, PET-SiAMPy or WPET-SiAMPy composite nanofibres achieved Cu2+ adsorption equilibrium within 60 secs of contact time with 0.98 mmol/g (89.87%) or 1.24 mmol/g (96.04%) Cu2+ adsorption capacity. The Cu2+ complex formation rate (k) with WPET-SiAMPy was 0.0888 with the mole ratio of Cu2+ and WPET-SiAMPy nanofibres 1:2. The complex molecular formula formed was Cu(WPET-SiAMPy)2 with a square planar geometry structure. The WPET-SiAMPy nanofibres’ adsorption was best fitted to the Freundlich isotherm. WPET-SiAMPy composite nanofibres were considered highly efficient for Cu2+ adsorption from aqueous solution and could be regenerated at least five times using 5 M H2SO4. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Molecularly Imprinted Films)
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13 pages, 5242 KiB  
Article
A Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Based SPR Sensor for 2-Furaldehyde Determination in Oil Matrices
by Maria Pesavento, Nunzio Cennamo, Luigi Zeni and Letizia De Maria
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(21), 10390; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112110390 - 5 Nov 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1380
Abstract
Optical chemosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) transduction are widely employed, even in complex environments, such as those outside the laboratory. In this context, not only the chemical nature but also the physical form of the receptor layer is particularly relevant. Synthetic receptors [...] Read more.
Optical chemosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) transduction are widely employed, even in complex environments, such as those outside the laboratory. In this context, not only the chemical nature but also the physical form of the receptor layer is particularly relevant. Synthetic receptors as molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are well suited. This is demonstrated here in the case of an SPR sensor platform based on a multimode plastic optical fiber, which is very promising for on site application due to the low dimensions and low cost. A specific MIP was used as the receptor, with high affinity for the substance to be determined, 2-furaldehyde, in water. Here, a medium of high refractive index, i.e., vegetable oil, was considered because of the high interest for its determination in industrial diagnostics. The effects of the MIP layer thickness and the washing extent on the quality of the analytical signal were investigated. Better spectra were generated at the thinner MIP layer, while a lower detection limit is reached with extended washing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Molecularly Imprinted Films)
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16 pages, 15668 KiB  
Article
Role of Functional Monomers upon the Properties of Bisphenol A Molecularly Imprinted Silica Films
by Ana-Mihaela Gavrila, Ionut-Cristian Radu, Hermine Stroescu, Anamaria Zaharia, Elena-Bianca Stoica, Ana-Lorena Ciurlica, Tanţa-Verona Iordache and Andrei Sârbu
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(7), 2956; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11072956 - 25 Mar 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1758
Abstract
In this study, two types of bisphenol A molecularly imprinted films (BPA-MIP) were successfully prepared via sol-gel derived methods using two different organosilane functional monomers N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (DAMO-T) or (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTES). The physical-chemical characterization of films, in terms of morphology, structure, thermal analysis, and [...] Read more.
In this study, two types of bisphenol A molecularly imprinted films (BPA-MIP) were successfully prepared via sol-gel derived methods using two different organosilane functional monomers N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (DAMO-T) or (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTES). The physical-chemical characterization of films, in terms of morphology, structure, thermal analysis, and optical features, suggested that thinner films with a homogenous porous structure were more likely to retain BPA molecules. The MIP films revealed the rapid and quantitative adsorption of BPA, registering the most specific binding in the first five minutes of contact with the BPA-MIP film. Silica films were effectively regenerated for further usage for at least five times, demonstrating their high stability and reusability. Even if the performance of films for BPA uptake dropped dramatically after the third adsorption/reconditioning cycle, this synthesis method for BPA-MIP films has proven to be a reliable and cheap way to prepare sensitive films with potential application for re-usable optical sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Molecularly Imprinted Films)
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Review

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32 pages, 1730 KiB  
Review
Modern and Dedicated Methods for Producing Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Layers in Sensing Applications
by Ana-Mihaela Gavrilă, Elena-Bianca Stoica, Tanţa-Verona Iordache and Andrei Sârbu
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(6), 3080; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12063080 - 17 Mar 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2877
Abstract
Molecular imprinting (MI) is the most available and known method to produce artificial recognition sites, similar to antibodies, inside or at the surface of a polymeric material. For this reason, scholars all over the world have found MI appealing, thus developing, in this [...] Read more.
Molecular imprinting (MI) is the most available and known method to produce artificial recognition sites, similar to antibodies, inside or at the surface of a polymeric material. For this reason, scholars all over the world have found MI appealing, thus developing, in this past period, various types of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) that can be applied to a wide range of applications, including catalysis, separation sciences and monitoring/diagnostic devices for chemicals, biochemicals and pharmaceuticals. For instance, the advantages brought by the use of MIPs in the sensing and analytics field refer to higher selectivity, sensitivity and low detection limits, but also to higher chemical and thermal stability as well as reusability. In light of recent literature findings, this review presents both modern and dedicated methods applied to produce MIP layers that can be integrated with existent detection systems. In this respect, the following MI methods to produce sensing layers are presented and discussed: surface polymerization, electropolymerization, sol–gel derived techniques, phase inversionand deposition of electroactive pastes/inks that include MIP particles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Molecularly Imprinted Films)
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