Special Issue "Optical Properties of Confined Quantum Systems"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanotechnology and Applied Nanosciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Serghei Klimin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Theory of Quantum Systems & Complex Systems Group, Department of physics, University of Antwerp, Prinsstraat 13, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium
Interests: condensed matter physics; quantum gases; polaron theory
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Confined quantum systems embrace a wide variety of subjects, ranging from nanostructures—particularly quantum dots, quantum wires, and planar nanostructures including graphene-based systems—to quantum systems of microscopic scale, such as quantum atomic gases.

Advances in the science of quantum nanostructures over the course of more than twenty years are remarkable. As a result, confined nanoscale quantum systems already have an outstanding spectrum of applications in various important areas. More recently, studies of quantum phenomena in ultracold atomic gases have seen steadily growing progress and increasing interest, nontrivially involving subjects specific to many other research areas (e.g., polaron physics). Consequently, the optical properties of confined quantum systems represent a great experimental and theoretical interest for their characterization and getting a picture of intrinsic quantum states and collective excitations, which can have significance for potential practical realizations, including even such a fascinating perspective as quantum computing, which is still expecting a breakthrough.

The main goal of this Special Issue is to bring together experimental and theoretical studies on the dynamic response of various classes of confined quantum systems and to encourage an interchange of ideas between specialists in different topics of this comprehensive scientific area. The scope of the Issue includes review papers and new original experimental and theoretical results.

Dr. Serghei Klimin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Optical response
  • Quantum dots
  • Nanostructures
  • Quantum gases

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Resonant Terahertz Light Absorption by Virtue of Tunable Hybrid Interface Phonon–Plasmon Modes in Semiconductor Nanoshells
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(7), 1442; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9071442 - 06 Apr 2019
Abstract
Metallic nanoshells have proven to be particularly versatile, with applications in biomedical imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that hybrid phonon-plasmon modes in semiconductor nanoshells offer similar advantages in the terahertz regime. We show that, depending on tm,n,nhe doping of [...] Read more.
Metallic nanoshells have proven to be particularly versatile, with applications in biomedical imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that hybrid phonon-plasmon modes in semiconductor nanoshells offer similar advantages in the terahertz regime. We show that, depending on tm,n,nhe doping of the semiconductor shells, terahertz light absorption in these nanostructures can be resonantly enhanced due to the strong coupling between interface plasmons and phonons. A threefold to fourfold increase in the absorption peak intensity was achieved at specific values of electron concentration. Doping, as well as adapting the nanoshell radius, allowed for fine-tuning of the absorption peak frequencies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Properties of Confined Quantum Systems)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Self-Consistent Derivation of the Modified Gross–Pitaevskii Equation with Lee–Huang–Yang Correction
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(10), 1998; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8101998 - 21 Oct 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
We consider a dilute and ultracold bosonic gas of weakly-interacting atoms. Within the framework of quantum field theory, we derive a zero-temperature modified Gross–Pitaevskii equation with beyond-mean-field corrections due to quantum depletion and anomalous density. This result is obtained from the stationary equation [...] Read more.
We consider a dilute and ultracold bosonic gas of weakly-interacting atoms. Within the framework of quantum field theory, we derive a zero-temperature modified Gross–Pitaevskii equation with beyond-mean-field corrections due to quantum depletion and anomalous density. This result is obtained from the stationary equation of the Bose–Einstein order parameter coupled to the Bogoliubov–de Gennes equations of the out-of-condensate field operator. We show that, in the presence of a generic external trapping potential, the key steps to get the modified Gross–Pitaevskii equation are the semiclassical approximation for the Bogoliubov–de Gennes equations, a slowly-varying order parameter and a small quantum depletion. In the uniform case, from the modified Gross–Pitaevskii equation, we get the familiar equation of state with Lee–Huang–Yang correction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Properties of Confined Quantum Systems)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Gaussian Quantum Trajectories for the Variational Simulation of Open Quantum-Optical Systems
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(9), 1427; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8091427 - 21 Aug 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
We construct a class of variational methods for the study of open quantum systems based on Gaussian ansatzes for the quantum trajectory formalism. Gaussianity in the conjugate position and momentum quadratures is distinguished from Gaussianity in density and phase. We apply these methods [...] Read more.
We construct a class of variational methods for the study of open quantum systems based on Gaussian ansatzes for the quantum trajectory formalism. Gaussianity in the conjugate position and momentum quadratures is distinguished from Gaussianity in density and phase. We apply these methods to a driven-dissipative Kerr cavity where we study dephasing and the stationary states throughout the bistability regime. Computational cost proves to be similar to the Truncated Wigner Approximation (TWA) method, with at most quadratic scaling in system size. Meanwhile, strong correspondence with the numerically-exact trajectory description is maintained so that these methods contain more information on the ensemble constitution than TWA and can be more robust. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Properties of Confined Quantum Systems)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop