Recent Progress in Large Animal Cardiology and Electrocardiography

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Equids".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 3459

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Equine Health and Performance Centre, School of Animal and Veterinary Science, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005, Australia
Interests: exercise physiology; sports medicine; poor performance; cardiorespiratory; cardiology; electrocardiography
Equine Health and Performance Centre, School of Animal and Veterinary Science, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005, Australia
Interests: cardiology; exercise; atrial fibrillation; sudden cardiac death; electrocardiography; echocardiography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Equine cardiology is a rapidly expanding discipline encompassing companion and leisure horses, performance horses and racehorses competing in the fields of endurance, harness, flat and jumps racing. The horse also serves as a natural research model for the athlete’s heart. Techniques for echocardiographic strain imaging, electrocardiographic mapping and vectorcardiography, and histopathological analysis are being translated from human medicine to the horse. In addition, the increasing use of new technologies such as wearable and portable electrocardiography and echocardiography devices enables data collection in the field, from large cohorts of horses. Based on these advancements, a greater understanding of cardiac electrical, structural and functional remodeling in health and disease is currently underway.

We are pleased to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue, which aims to be a state-of-the-art collection of papers exemplifying recent leaps in our understanding of equine cardiology. 

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include, but are not limited to, the following: the clinical and research-based use of new technologies and techniques for electrocardiography and echocardiography, and new diagnostic methods and treatments for equine cardiac disease. It is intended that the published articles will enhance our current understanding of the identification, interpretation and management of equine cardiac disorders.

We look forward to receiving your contributions. 

Dr. Samantha H. Franklin
Dr. Laura C. Nath
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cardiology
  • heart
  • arrhythmia
  • atrial fibrillation
  • electrocardiography
  • echocardiography
  • exercise
  • disease
  • athlete

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 3053 KiB  
Article
Cardiac Changes after Lactate-Guided Conditioning in Young Purebred Arabian Horses
by Maíra M. Santos, Gabriel V. Ramos, Isabela M. de Figueiredo, Tainá C. B. V. Silva and José C. Lacerda-Neto
Animals 2023, 13(11), 1800; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13111800 - 29 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1169
Abstract
Cardiac adaptation to conditioning in horses was evaluated after empirical training based on trainers’ experience. Twelve purebred Arabian horses, aged (mean ± SD) 28.42 ± 3.75 months, which did not perform any type of exercise prior to the research, were submitted to treadmill [...] Read more.
Cardiac adaptation to conditioning in horses was evaluated after empirical training based on trainers’ experience. Twelve purebred Arabian horses, aged (mean ± SD) 28.42 ± 3.75 months, which did not perform any type of exercise prior to the research, were submitted to treadmill conditioning for six weeks. The conditioning program was based on the velocity run by the horse at which the blood lactate concentration, determined in an incremental exercise test (IET), reached 2 mmol/L (V2). The velocity at which the blood lactate concentration reached 4 mmol/L (V4) was also determined. The echocardiograms were performed at rest with pulsed-wave and tissue Doppler imaging in B- and M-modes. All procedures were carried out before and after the conditioning period. The results showed increases in V2 (from 5.2 ± 0.3 to 6.7 ± 0.4 m/s) and V4 (from 5.8 ± 0.4 to 7.6 ± 0.5 m/s) (p < 0.0001). There were also increases in the left ventricle internal diameter at diastole (LVIDd), left ventricle mass (LV mass), and stroke volume (SV), while no changes were observed in the LV free wall thickness and mean and relative wall thicknesses. The conditioning protocol, which was completed by all horses, proved to be safe and efficient, as it improved the aerobic capacity of the animals. Finally, the cardiac remodeling that occurred was mainly associated with the effect of physical training. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Large Animal Cardiology and Electrocardiography)
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12 pages, 919 KiB  
Article
Assessment of P Wave Indices in Healthy Standardbred Horses
by Rebecca White, Laura Nath, Michelle Hebart and Samantha Franklin
Animals 2023, 13(6), 1070; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13061070 - 16 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1449
Abstract
P wave indices are used as non-invasive electrocardiographic markers of atrial remodelling in humans. Few studies have investigated their use in animals. The aim of this study was to measure P wave duration and P wave dispersion (Pd) in healthy standardbred horses and [...] Read more.
P wave indices are used as non-invasive electrocardiographic markers of atrial remodelling in humans. Few studies have investigated their use in animals. The aim of this study was to measure P wave duration and P wave dispersion (Pd) in healthy standardbred horses and investigate variables that might influence these measurements. A 12-lead electrocardiogram was recorded at rest and P wave indices were calculated in 53 horses. A general linear model was used to investigate the main effects: age, bodyweight, sex, resting heart rate, presence of a murmur, exercise status and the number of years raced. There were significant associations with exercise status for both the maximum P wave duration and Pd, with both values being increased in strenuously exercising versus non-active horses. Furthermore, a significant moderate positive correlation was identified between the duration of exercise (number of years raced) and both Pmax and Pd. No other significant associations were identified. These findings are similar to those reported in elite human athletes versus sedentary individuals. The increases in these P wave indices most likely occur due to prolongation and heterogeneity in atrial conduction time, which are associated with structural and electrical remodelling, and may explain the increased risk of atrial fibrillation in athletic horses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Large Animal Cardiology and Electrocardiography)
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