Recent Advances in Waterbird Ecology and Conservation

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Ecology and Conservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 465

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Departamento de Zooloxía, Xenética e Antropoloxía Física, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: bird ecology; bird conservation; breeding biology; conservation biology; endangered species; waders
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Zooloxía, Xenética e Antropoloxía Física, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: bird ecology; bird conservation; breeding biology; conservation biology; endangered species; waders

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Waterbirds face numerous threats, including habitat loss and degradation, pollution, climate change, unsustainable hunting, and collisions with infrastructure. They play important roles in aquatic ecosystems and their presence as well as behavior can significantly influence the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems.

Advances in the knowledge of the ecology and conservation of waterbirds are essential for understanding and protecting aquatic ecosystems, ensuring biodiversity, maintaining ecosystem services, and promoting human well-being. Continuous advances in research are needed to address the growing threats facing these birds and ensure their long-term survival.

In this Special Issue, we invite contributions that, at the interface of waterbird ecology and conservation, investigate populations and behaviors, providing valuable information about the overall health of aquatic ecosystems and potential environmental impacts. We invite the results of research focusing on understanding threats in order to implement effective conservation measures that protect waterbird populations and their habitats. A diverse approach to waterbird conservation assessment, reflecting various fronts (metapopulation dynamics, winter ecology, effects of long-term ecosystem changes, key habitats and or focus areas, degree of depredation of nesting populations, factors inhibiting successful reproduction, disturbance tolerance levels, the effects, if any, of contaminants on migrant versus resident populations, etc.), may help to develop methods of monitoring and effectively managing populations.

Prof. Dr. Jesús Domínguez
Dr. María Vidal Malde
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • conservation advances
  • endangered species
  • waterbird ecology
  • waterbird conservation
  • waterbirds

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

24 pages, 1839 KiB  
Review
A Review of the Conservation Status of Shorebirds in Mongolia
by Sundev Gombobaatar, Dorj Ususkhjargal and Reuven Yosef
Animals 2024, 14(12), 1752; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14121752 - 10 Jun 2024
Viewed by 269
Abstract
We present the first comprehensive review of 62 migratory shorebird species in Mongolia, covering their ecological status, IUCN assessments at regional or national levels, population trends, threats, and conservation measures. Mongolia hosts a total of 62 shorebird species from twenty-two genera and seven [...] Read more.
We present the first comprehensive review of 62 migratory shorebird species in Mongolia, covering their ecological status, IUCN assessments at regional or national levels, population trends, threats, and conservation measures. Mongolia hosts a total of 62 shorebird species from twenty-two genera and seven families, with six species classified as globally threatened: the Critically Endangered Sociable Lapwing, the Endangered Siberian Sandplover, the Far Eastern Curlew, the Great Knot, and the Vulnerable Sharp-Tailed Sandpiper. Both national and global IUCN Red List assessments highlight Mongolia’s significance as a breeding and passage migrating site for globally threatened and Near-Threatened shorebirds. Species richness is higher in northern regions compared to the south, with the highest diversity found in areas with complex aquatic ecosystems. Global population trends indicate a decline in 61% of species, with 18% remaining stable, 16% of unknown status, and 5% increasing. At the national level, most species are stable (61%), 34% status is unknown, and 5% are decreasing. Anthropogenic-induced threats, including habitat loss and degradation, pollution, disturbance, and harvesting, pose significant risks to 69% of species, while natural disasters affect 11%. Additionally, 8% of species are impacted by accidental mortality and intrinsic factors, and 5% by changes in native species. Despite these threats, no specific conservation action plans exist for shorebirds in Mongolia. However, general conservation measures are in place, such as environmental and fauna protection laws, regulations on foreign trade in endangered species, and the establishment of protected areas under governmental resolutions. Mongolia also participates in international conventions like the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), Ramsar, and Migratory Species (CMS), and has developed national red lists, red books, and publications such as A Summary Conservation Action Plan for Mongolian Birds, Important Bird Areas to support conservation efforts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Waterbird Ecology and Conservation)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Year 1 after the 2022 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) outbreak in eastern Canada: Assessing population impacts on seabirds breeding in Atlantic Canada
Authors: Sabina Wilhelm
Affiliation: Environment and Climate Change Canada, Gatineau, Canada

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