Probiotics in Allergy, Asthma and Respiratory Infections

A special issue of Allergies (ISSN 2313-5786). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Allergy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 6438

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Allergy Clinic, Department of Outpatients, Casa di Cura Villa Montallegro, Genoa, Italy
Interests: allergy; asthma; respiratory infections; immunology; inflammation

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Guest Editor
Allergy Center, Department of Pediatrics, Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Genoa, Italy
Interests: pediatrics; allergy; asthma; immunology; infections
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pediatric Allergy Center, Istituto Giannina Gaslini IRCCS, Genoa, Italy
Interests: pediatrics; allergy; asthma; immunology; infections
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Allergic diseases, asthma, and respiratory infections pose significant healthcare issues. Allergic diseases have a prevalence reaching 40% in the general population, with the number of allergic patients continuously growing. The Hygiene Hypothesis, and then the Microbiota Hypothesis, posited that excessive hygiene and consequently dysbiosis and reduced microbiota biodiversity were the causes of this "Allergy Epidemic." Consequently, the idea of manipulating the immune system using probiotics to rebalance eubiosis and restore the physiological immune response was developed.

Several studies have investigated the role of probiotics in managing allergic patients by relieving suffering from allergic rhinitis, asthma, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis. Moreover, it is well-known that asthma exacerbations are frequently preceded by acute respiratory infections. As a result, probiotics were investigated to demonstrate a possible preventive effect on infections and consequently on asthma.

Therefore, the present Special Issue aims to collect a series of manuscripts (mostly reviews) concerning the role of probiotics in managing allergic diseases, asthma, and respiratory infections associated with asthma and allergies.

Dr. Giorgio Ciprandi
Dr. Maria Angela Tosca
Dr. Michele Miraglia del Giudice
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Allergies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • allergy
  • asthma
  • allergic rhinitis
  • food allergy
  • atopic dermatitis
  • respiratory infections
  • probiotics
  • management
  • prevention

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

18 pages, 520 KiB  
Review
Efficacy and Safety of Oral Probiotics in Children with Allergic Rhinitis: A Review
by Angela Klain, Giulio Dinardo, Cristiana Indolfi, Marcella Contieri, Alessandra Salvatori, Sossio Vitale, Fabio Decimo, Giorgio Ciprandi and Michele Miraglia del Giudice
Allergies 2023, 3(1), 72-89; https://doi.org/10.3390/allergies3010006 - 07 Mar 2023
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Abstract
The prevalence of allergic rhinitis is rising, and it is impacting children’s growth and quality of life. To uncover unconventional treatment modalities, research was carried out to clarify the significance of novel components in the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis. One of these elements [...] Read more.
The prevalence of allergic rhinitis is rising, and it is impacting children’s growth and quality of life. To uncover unconventional treatment modalities, research was carried out to clarify the significance of novel components in the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis. One of these elements was gut microbiota, which plays a crucial role in the development and evolution of allergic disorders. Specifically, dysbiosis, defined as impaired microbiota composition, characterizes allergic disorders. In light of this concept, probiotics (beneficial bacteria) may restore gut dysbiosis, rebalance the immune response, and indirectly influence the clinical course of allergic diseases. In this article, we discussed the role of the gut–lung axis in children and reported on new findings. We also reviewed the most relevant studies about probiotics in patients with allergic rhinitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics in Allergy, Asthma and Respiratory Infections)
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8 pages, 780 KiB  
Review
A Brief Review of Local Bacteriotherapy for Preventing Respiratory Infections
by Giorgio Ciprandi, Valerio Damiani, Vittorio Cordara and Maria Angela Tosca
Allergies 2022, 2(4), 138-145; https://doi.org/10.3390/allergies2040013 - 07 Nov 2022
Viewed by 1662
Abstract
Recurrent respiratory infections (RRIs) account for relevant economic and social implications and significantly affect family life. Local Bacteriotherapy (LB) represents an innovative option in preventing RRIs. Local bacteriotherapy consists of administering “good” and safe bacteria (probiotics) by nasal or oral route. In particular, [...] Read more.
Recurrent respiratory infections (RRIs) account for relevant economic and social implications and significantly affect family life. Local Bacteriotherapy (LB) represents an innovative option in preventing RRIs. Local bacteriotherapy consists of administering “good” and safe bacteria (probiotics) by nasal or oral route. In particular, two strains (Streptococcus salivarius 24SMB and Streptococcus oralis 89a) are commonly used. The present article presents and discusses the literature concerning LB. Infections of airways include the upper and lower respiratory tract. A series of clinical trials investigated the preventive role of LB in preventing upper and lower RIs. These studies demonstrated that LB safely reduced the prevalence and severity of RIs, the use of antibiotics, and absences from school. Therefore, Local Bacteriotherapy may be considered an interesting therapeutic option in RRI prevention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics in Allergy, Asthma and Respiratory Infections)
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