Special Issue "Integrated Pest Management in Agricultural Systems"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 June 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Carmelo Rapisarda
Website
Guest Editor
University of Catania, Dipartimento di Agricoltura, Alimentazione e Ambiente (Di3A)
Interests: insect biodiversity in natural, forest and agricultural ecosystems; insect pests in agriculture; climate change and invasive insects; sustainable pest control on crops; biological control of pests; integrated pest management in Mediterranean climate; integrated production and protection of crops

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) has been developed as an alternative to the widespread use of chemical pesticides for controlling pests in agrosystems. Based on the harmonized and strategic use of different tactics (biological, cultural, physical, etc.) to be combined with chemical control, it aims at maintaining pest populations below the economic damage thresholds, while reducing secondary effects on the environment, as well as on plant, animal and human health.

This Special Issue intends to assess the status of IPM techniques, especially in the frame of climatic dynamism and global movement of organisms which are improving pest problems. It also gives an overview on advances in integrated strategies for controlling pests in the major agricultural crops, both grasses and trees. I would like to invite all of you studying IPM in agricultural systems, in different countries and regions, to contribute to this Special Issue. Both original research and reviews are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Carmelo Rapisarda
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Novel insecticides and IPM
  • Side effects of pesticides
  • Biological control of crop pests
  • Physical and mechanical control of pests
  • Cultural control of pests
  • Biotechnologies for pest control
  • IPM in annual food crops
  • IPM in fruit tree crops
  • IPM in protected vegetable cops

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Experimental Nets for a Protection System against the Vectors of Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al.
Agriculture 2019, 9(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture9020032 - 05 Feb 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The effectiveness of experimental nets in preventing the access of adult meadow spittlebug Philaenus spumarius L., the main vector of Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al. subspecies pauca, sequence type (ST) 53, in olive tree nurseries and orchards was evaluated. To optimize the [...] Read more.
The effectiveness of experimental nets in preventing the access of adult meadow spittlebug Philaenus spumarius L., the main vector of Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al. subspecies pauca, sequence type (ST) 53, in olive tree nurseries and orchards was evaluated. To optimize the net design, mesh size, kind of fabric, thread typology, and radiometric properties, six nets with different mesh sizes and kinds of fabric were evaluated in laboratory and in field experiments. Laboratory bioassays evaluating the capability of adult spittlebugs to pass through nets with different mesh sizes (1.2, 1.8, 2.4 mm) showed that all nets with a mesh size equal to or lower than 2.4 mm prevented insect crossing. These results were confirmed in field conditions using an experimental net box apparatus. Further laboratory tests showed a positive correlation between porosity and radiometric properties of the nets. Three prototypes of thermally stabilized flat woven nets made of circular cross-sectional yarns, knitted net with strips, and knitted nets made of yarns were tested after the evaluation of their potential usability in terms of porosity stability. The knitted net features were found to be the most suitable. The net transmissivity of the total and direct component of solar radiation in the photosynthetically active radiation and the infrared ranges increased with the net porosity. A prism-shaped wooden frame with a triangular base covered with the knitted net with a 2.4 mm mesh confirmed the insect’s capability of reaching considerable heights, up to 2.85 m. Hence, based on our results, the monowire knitted net with a 2.4 mm mesh can be used in open field nursery and olive orchards to prevent the access of P. spumarius adults and to shield the openings of greenhouse nurseries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Pest Management in Agricultural Systems)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Determination of Insecticide Susceptibility of Field Populations of Tomato Leaf Miner (Tuta absoluta) in Northern Nigeria
Agriculture 2019, 9(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture9010007 - 01 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In 2016, northern Nigeria experienced a devastating infestation by the tomato leaf miner, leading to soaring in prices of tomatoes across the country. Unfortunately, information on the resistance status of this pest is lacking in northern Nigeria, hampering appropriate control measures. Here, we [...] Read more.
In 2016, northern Nigeria experienced a devastating infestation by the tomato leaf miner, leading to soaring in prices of tomatoes across the country. Unfortunately, information on the resistance status of this pest is lacking in northern Nigeria, hampering appropriate control measures. Here, we identified to species level and, using bioassays, characterised insecticide susceptibility profile of a field population of a tomato leaf miner from northern Nigeria. Highest resistance was observed with λ-cyhalothrin (a Type II pyrethroid) with a low mortality (18.52% at 56 h) and LD50 of 7461.474 ppm. Resistance was also established toward propoxur and chlorpyrifos-methyl with average mortalities each of 56% and LD50s of 1023.51 ppm and 106.351 ppm, respectively. Highest susceptibility was observed from abamectin with mortality of 86% and LD50 of 0.034 ppm. Pre-exposure to the synergist piperonylbutoxide significantly recovered λ–cyhalothrin susceptibility ((mortality~90%, χ2 = 98.35, p < 0.0001) and LD50 = 0.92 ppm) implicating P450 monoxygenases. No significant changes were observed on pre-exposure to diethyl maleate and triphenylphosphate-inhibitors of glutathione S-transferases and carboxylesterases, respectively. Sequencing of domain II of the voltage-gated sodium channel established 1014F kdr mutation 100% fixed in both λ-cyhalothrin-alive and dead larvae. These findings highlight the challenges for control of this invasive agricultural pest in northern Nigeria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Pest Management in Agricultural Systems)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop