Special Issue "Cotton Production and Quality Research"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Paxton Payton

USDA-ARS Cropping Systems Research Laboratory, Lubbock, TX 79415, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cotton production; physiological and genetic mechanisms of crop responses to environmental stress

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cotton (Gossypium sp.) is the world’s leading natural fiber and second largest oilseed crop in production. The majority of cotton’s value resides in the fiber and while production has increased over the past two decades, fiber quality has declined over the same time-span in many production regions. This downward trend has been attributed to the general erosion of genetic diversity and an increase in low-input systems and expanded production in marginal environments. Concurrently, the textile industry has transitioned toward spinning technology that demands fibers that are long, uniform, mature, fine, strong, and with low contamination levels. Production and preservation of cotton fibre quality from new germplasm, improved in-season crop management, timely and efficient harvesting, and ginning are all critical factors to meet these demands and to compete with synthetic fibres. Sustainable production and preservation of fibre quality, especially in stressful environments, requires improvements in each of these areas and new systems-level approaches that incorporate physiology, genetics, agronomy, and engineering.

This Special Issue welcomes original research and review articles that provide insights on all topics related to the production and preservation of cotton fiber quality from biology, in-season management, harvest, and post-harvest processes. The scope of submission includes all aspects of cotton fiber yield and quality (breeding for improved yield, crop management including irrigation and fertility studies, fiber development, fiber quality/maturity modelling predictions), as well as harvest and post-harvest operations (on-board quality prediction during harvest, plastic contamination detection and removal, quality maintenance during ginning).

Dr. Paxton Payton
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cotton fibre quality
  • cotton fibre maturity
  • cotton harvesting and ginning
  • cotton plastic contamination
  • cotton fibre maturity modelling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Planting Date Effects on Cotton Lint Yield and Fiber Quality in the U.S. Southern High Plains
Agriculture 2019, 9(4), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture9040082
Received: 8 March 2019 / Revised: 10 April 2019 / Accepted: 17 April 2019 / Published: 22 April 2019
PDF Full-text (3462 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Cotton planting date effects in the U.S. Southern High Plains (SHP) were evaluated based on 11 years of May-planted and June-planted irrigated variety trials. Multiple cultivars planted in each year’s trial allowed for the calculation of 153 yield effects and 162 effects in [...] Read more.
Cotton planting date effects in the U.S. Southern High Plains (SHP) were evaluated based on 11 years of May-planted and June-planted irrigated variety trials. Multiple cultivars planted in each year’s trial allowed for the calculation of 153 yield effects and 162 effects in 5 fiber quality parameters. Yield and quality effects were considered in the context of related changes in total growing season degree days (GDDS) and total cool hours (CHRS) during a boll formation period 80 to 110 days after planting. May planting increased GDDS and significantly increased yields in 8 of 10 years that comparisons could be made. Micronaire and fiber elongation were the most sensitive quality parameters to planting date. June planting resulted in increased CHRS every year and a significantly higher incidence of low micronaire in 7 of 11 years. In 7 of 11 years May planting significantly reduced fiber elongation relative to June planting. Analysis of SHP temperature data show that late-April to early-May planting dates may increase yield and micronaire by maximizing GDDS and minimizing CHRS. Although this practice may be optimal to the SHP environment it may also require high-vigor seed and pre-planting irrigation. Adapting genetics to an early planting strategy might include selecting for improved seed vigor and cold germination with acceptable yield and fiber quality traits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cotton Production and Quality Research)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Impacts of Irrigation Termination Date on Cotton Yield and Irrigation Requirement
Agriculture 2019, 9(2), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture9020039
Received: 14 January 2019 / Revised: 3 February 2019 / Accepted: 16 February 2019 / Published: 19 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2591 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Optimization of cotton irrigation termination (IT) can lead to more efficient utilization and conservation of limited water resources in many cotton production areas across the U.S. This study evaluated the effects of three IT timings on yield, fiber quality, and irrigation requirements of [...] Read more.
Optimization of cotton irrigation termination (IT) can lead to more efficient utilization and conservation of limited water resources in many cotton production areas across the U.S. This study evaluated the effects of three IT timings on yield, fiber quality, and irrigation requirements of irrigated cotton in southwest Oklahoma during three growing seasons. The results showed cotton yield increased with later IT dates, but this response was highly dependent on the amount and timing of late-season precipitation events. Only a few fiber quality parameters were significantly different among treatments, suggesting a more limited impact of IT on fiber quality. When averaged over the three study years, the lint yield was significantly different amongst all treatments, with an average increase of 347 kg ha−1 from the earliest to the latest IT. Additionally, the seed yield and the micronaire were similar for the two earlier IT treatments and significantly smaller than the values under the latest IT treatment. The differences in fiber uniformity and strength were also significant amongst IT treatments. Strong positive relationships were found between yield components and average late-season water content in the root zone. Lint and seed yields plateaued at an average late-season soil matric potential of about −30 kPa and had a quadratic decline as soil moisture depleted. When benchmarked against the latest IT treatment, the earlier IT treatments achieved average reductions of 16–28% in irrigation requirement. However, this water conservation was accompanied with considerable declines in yield components and micronaire and smaller declines in fiber length, uniformity, and strength. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cotton Production and Quality Research)
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