Special Issue "Entrepreneurial Intentions: Emerging Issues"

A special issue of Administrative Sciences (ISSN 2076-3387). This special issue belongs to the section "International Entrepreneurship".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Marina Z. Solesvik
Website
Guest Editor
Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, 5063 Bergen, Norway
Interests: entrepreneurial intentions; entrepreneurial mindset; female entrepreneurship; strategic alliances; technology innovation; maritime business

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research on entrepreneurial intentions (EI) among young people has been a popular topic for the last thirty years. Starting with the seminal works of Shapero and Sokol (1982), who offered the entrepreneurial event model, and Barbara Bird (1988), who proposed the model of implementing entrepreneurial ideas, a growing number of studies examine entrepreneurial intentions. Krueger and Carsrud (1993) and Kolvereid (1996) linked the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1991) to entrepreneurial intentions. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) is probably the most popular theory of EI research. A variety of scholars from different countries tested the theory of planned behavior alone and with additional variables in relation to the entrepreneurship intentions phenomenon. In this Special Issue, we seek to explore the novel theoretical perspectives of this hot topic. More specifically, we are looking forward to papers grounded on research streams other than the TPB and the entrepreneurial event model. The understanding of what factors lead to higher intentions and subsequent entrepreneurial actions among students may offer novel and constructive insights not only to entrepreneurship scholars, but also entrepreneurship educators and policy makers seeking to involve young people into value creation. 

The following topics are sought for the Special Issue:

  • The influence of national culture on entrepreneurial intentions;
  • The role of context in shaping entrepreneurial intentions;
  • Studies of entrepreneurial intentions across countries;
  • Gender aspects of entrepreneurial intentions;
  • Influence of personality factors on entrepreneurial intentions;
  • General and specific human capital in forming entrepreneurial intentions;’
  • The role of enterprise education in shaping entrepreneurial intentions;
  • Family business and entrepreneurial intentions;
  • The gap between intentions and entrepreneurial actions;
  • Social entrepreneurship intentions among students;
  • Sustainable entrepreneurship intention;
  • Dynamic entrepreneurial intentions models.

This call seeks to highlight new avenues in entrepreneurial intentions research. Several avenues seem particularly promising; for example, we still do not know much about the factors influencing the path from entrepreneurial intentions to real actions. Alternatively, could it be beneficial to design enterprise education programs specifically for females and males? Hence, we seek papers that try to find answers to interesting research questions. As quantitative studies have dominated the field of EI research, we seek papers that use qualitative approach, quantitative surveys, or a mixed method research, as well as longitudinal studies, the present lack of which is also notable. We welcome submissions that explore entrepreneurial intentions across countries. The papers submitted to the Special Issue should clearly highlight novel theoretical and methodological contribution to the knowledge base.

References

Bird, B. (1988). Implementing entrepreneurial ideas: The case for intention, Academy of Management Review, 13 (3), 442-453.

Bogatyreva, K., Edelman, L. F., Manolova, T. S., Osiyevskyy, O., & Shirokova, G. (2019). When do entrepreneurial intentions lead to actions? The role of national culture. Journal of Business Research96, 309-321.

Edelman, L. F., Manolova, T., Shirokova, G. & Tsukanova, T. (2016). The impact of family support on young entrepreneurs' start-up activities, Journal of Business Venturing, 31 (4), 428-448.

Fayolle, A., & Liñán, F. (2014). The future of research on entrepreneurial intentions, Journal of Business Research, 67 (5), 663-666.

Kolvereid, L. (1996). Prediction of employment status choice intentions, Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice, 21 (1), 47-58.

Krueger, N. (2009). Entrepreneurial intentions are dead: Long live entrepreneurial intentions, in Understanding the Entrepreneurial Mind, Springer, New York, pp. 51-72.

Krueger, N. F. & Carsrud, A. L. (1993). Entrepreneurial intentions: applying the theory of planned behaviour, Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, 5(4), 315-330.

Liñán, F., & Fayolle, A. (2015). A systematic literature review on entrepreneurial intentions: citation, thematic analyses, and research agenda. International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal11(4), 907-933.

Nabi, G., Liñán, F., Fayolle, A., Krueger, N., & Walmsley, A. (2017). The impact of entrepreneurship education in higher education: A systematic review and research agenda. Academy of Management Learning & Education16(2), 277-299.

Shapero, A. and Sokol, L. (1982). The social dimensions of entrepreneurship, In Encyclopedia of Entrepreneurship (pp. 72-90).

Schlaegel, C. & Koenig, M. (2014). Determinants of entrepreneurial intent: a meta‐analytic test and integration of competing models, Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 38(2), 291-332.

Sieger, P. & Minola, T. (2017). The family's financial support as a "poisoned gift": A family embeddedness perspective on entrepreneurial intentions, Journal of Small Business Management, 55 (S1), 179-204.

Solesvik, M. Z. (2013). Entrepreneurial motivations and intentions: investigating the role of education major. Education+ Training, 55(3), 253-271.

Solesvik, M. Z. (2017). A cross-national study of personal initiative as a mediator between self-efficacy and entrepreneurial intentions. Journal of East-West Business23(3), 215-237.

Solesvik, M., Westhead, P., Matlay, H. & Parsyak, V. (2013). Entrepreneurial assets and mindsets: benefit from university entrepreneurship education investment, Education+ Training, 55 (8/9), 748-762.

Solesvik, M., Westhead, P. & Matlay, H. (2014). Cultural factors and entrepreneurial intention: The role of entrepreneurship education, Education+ Training, 56 (8/9), 680-696.

Westhead, P. & Solesvik, M.  (2016). Entrepreneurship education and entrepreneurial intention: Do female students benefit?, International Small Business Journal, 34(8), 979-1003.

Prof. Dr. Marina Solesvik
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • entrepreneurial intentions
  • national culture
  • intention–action gap

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Effects of Hackathons on the Entrepreneurial Skillset and Perceived Self-Efficacy as Factors Shaping Entrepreneurial Intentions
Adm. Sci. 2020, 10(3), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci10030073 - 14 Sep 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Purpose: While traditional university programs primarily use regularly scheduled classes as the primary means for developing students, this program evaluation explores the direct effects of intensive entrepreneurial learning activity in the format of a hackathon. This is one of the first papers to [...] Read more.
Purpose: While traditional university programs primarily use regularly scheduled classes as the primary means for developing students, this program evaluation explores the direct effects of intensive entrepreneurial learning activity in the format of a hackathon. This is one of the first papers to explore the learning outcomes of hackathons as an intensive entrepreneurial pedagogy. Design/methodology/approach: The researchers implemented a pre-test/post-test model with students participating in an entrepreneurship hackathon and tested the changes in their confidence levels in the ability to craft a successful entrepreneurial venture. Findings: The results support a hackathon model of entrepreneurial learning. As the result of a one-day workshop, significant results were achieved for self-reported ability in identifying a viable entrepreneurial concept, and for having the ability to successfully launch a new venture. Further, class standing and prior entrepreneurial courses, as well as gender did not influence the learning outcomes. Importantly, while hackathon-generated increases in entrepreneurial self-efficacy proved to be statistically significant, same gains proved not to be significant in a traditional entrepreneurship class setting. Authors conclude that short, intensive entrepreneurship learning methods like hackathons may be more effective in developing entrepreneurial self-efficacy than semester long courses. Originality/value: A hackathon is likely an effective entrepreneurial learning methodology suitable for a general student population which includes students with limited knowledge of and interest in entrepreneurship. The usefulness of a hackathon for entrepreneurial learning has potential implications for educators, scholars and policy makers. For educators, a hackathon approach may outperform a number of traditional entrepreneurship pedagogies in the form of lectures, case studies, class discussions or even a business plan development over a semester-long course. A hackathon may also allow students to gain entrepreneurial skills and self-confidence much quicker and using less resources than in a traditional entrepreneurial course. The potential reasons for these findings as well as their implications are discussed along with future research areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entrepreneurial Intentions: Emerging Issues)
Open AccessArticle
‘Non-Routine Entrepreneurs’: Another Path of Realizing Entrepreneurial Intentions
Adm. Sci. 2019, 9(2), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci9020038 - 14 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The paper seeks to introduce the definition and to specify the characteristic features of “non-routine entrepreneurs”. Using the notion of entrepreneurship by Shane and Venkataraman (2000), it explains “non-routine entrepreneurs” as persons driven primarily by the idea of exploring entrepreneurial opportunities, but less [...] Read more.
The paper seeks to introduce the definition and to specify the characteristic features of “non-routine entrepreneurs”. Using the notion of entrepreneurship by Shane and Venkataraman (2000), it explains “non-routine entrepreneurs” as persons driven primarily by the idea of exploring entrepreneurial opportunities, but less interested in being formally engaged in owing/managing a business or to claim additional incomes from it. The empirical base of the papers is two cases, labelled as a “patriot” and a “big tipster”, from a panel of entrepreneurs, self-employees and start-ups the author surveyed in Moscow in three annual waves (2013–2015, N = 13). The paper shows the differences between the “non-routine entrepreneurs” and already well investigated groups (latent entrepreneurs, informal entrepreneurs, hybrid entrepreneurs, freelancers) and examines the personal (human capital) and social (transitional shock) context of the evolution of entrepreneurial intentions and their motivation. The “non-routine-entrepreneurs” fill in the lack of evidence about entrepreneurially minded persons with non-monetary goals, or non-economic meaning of results from such activities. Thus, the paper contributes to the literature on the reason and the intentionality of entrepreneurship. It concludes that “non-routine entrepreneurship” might become the choice of many people in contemporary societies where the boundaries between different kinds of economic activities are blurred. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entrepreneurial Intentions: Emerging Issues)
Open AccessArticle
Growth Intention and Growth in Small Accounting Firms
Adm. Sci. 2019, 9(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci9020036 - 30 Apr 2019
Abstract
Previous research has found that owner/manager growth intention is related to subsequent firm growth, but growth intention alone only explains about 4–5% of the variance in actual firm growth. The purpose of this study is to investigate factors in addition to growth intention [...] Read more.
Previous research has found that owner/manager growth intention is related to subsequent firm growth, but growth intention alone only explains about 4–5% of the variance in actual firm growth. The purpose of this study is to investigate factors in addition to growth intention that may help us to explain a higher proportion of the variance in firm growth. We selected three factors for our study: Entrepreneurial orientation, versatile human resources and labor productivity. We tested the hypotheses in a sample of small Norwegian accounting firms. The findings indicate that, after controlling for growth intention, versatile human resources and labor, productivity contributed to the explanation of the variance in sales and employment growth, while entrepreneurial orientation has no such additional effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entrepreneurial Intentions: Emerging Issues)
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