Human's Psychological and Physiological Responses to Sound Environment

A special issue of Acoustics (ISSN 2624-599X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 December 2022) | Viewed by 30170

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Architecture and Industrial Design, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: psychoacoustic; environmental acoustic; virtual reality; noise exposure
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Guest Editor
Architectural School, Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518055, China
Interests: soundscape research; green architectural design; environmental research of ecocity
Sound Perception & Assessment (SPA), HEAD Acoustics GmbH, 52134 Herzogenrath, Germany
Interests: emotion; physiology; acoustic environment; machine learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The multisensory stimuli of the environment that surround us significantly impact our perception, feelings, moods, cognitive performances, and behaviors. They evoke both physiological and psychological responses, which may affect physical and mental wellbeing in both the short and the long term. Psychological and physiological feedback may highlight the importance of different sensory stimuli on our wellbeing and help to understand cognitive and behavioral responses to the environment during everyday life.

Sound is one of the main factors affecting humans’ physiological and psychological responses. It significantly interacts with other environmental elements/factors and with a person’s activity, mental state, expectation, memory, personality, and cultural background.

The development of new tools and techniques, such as extended reality (XR), smart and wearable devices for physiological and environmental monitoring, and machine learning techniques, has increased interest in understanding the complex connections between the sound environment and humans’ responses in the fields of the environmental acoustics, noise at work, building and room acoustics, as well as of soundscape.

This Special Issue encourages the submission of original works of laboratory and field studies, applied methodologies and techniques, critical perspectives, and reviews in psychological and physiological responses to a sound environment.

It focuses but is not limited to the following subjects:

  • Emotional and mental state in the sound environment;
  • Cognitive responses to sound environment;
  • Human restoration and quiet environment;
  • Effects of sound on performances in work environment;
  • Physiological measurements in the noisy and quiet environment;
  • Wearable environmental monitoring;
  • Machine learning and advanced statistical techniques;
  • Psychophysiological datasets on the sound and multisensory environment;
  • Human's responses in virtual, augmented, and mixed reality experiments.

Dr. Massimiliano Masullo
Prof. Dr. Lei Yu
Dr. Ming Yang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Acoustics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental noise
  • soundscape
  • annoyance
  • emotion
  • restoration
  • physiological responses
  • extended reality
  • wearable devices
  • machine learning

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 1656 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Listeners’ Mood on Equalization-Based Listening Experience
by Nefeli Dourou, Valeria Bruschi, Susanna Spinsante and Stefania Cecchi
Acoustics 2022, 4(3), 746-763; https://doi.org/10.3390/acoustics4030045 - 1 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3555
Abstract
Using equalization to improve sound listening experience is a well-established topic among the audio society. Finding a general equalization curve is a difficult task because of spectral content influenced by the reproduction system (loudspeakers and room environment) and personal preference diversity. Listeners’ mood [...] Read more.
Using equalization to improve sound listening experience is a well-established topic among the audio society. Finding a general equalization curve is a difficult task because of spectral content influenced by the reproduction system (loudspeakers and room environment) and personal preference diversity. Listeners’ mood is said to be a factor that affects the individual equalization preference. In this study, the effect of a listener’s mood on equalization preference is tried to be investigated. Starting from an experiment with fifty-two listeners, considering five predefined equalization curves and a database of ten music excerpts, the relationship between listeners’ mood and preferred sound equalization has been studied. The main findings of this study showed that the “High-frequency boosting” equalization was the most preferred among participants. However, the “High-frequency boosting” preference of low-aroused people was slightly lower than the high aroused listeners, increasing the preference of the “Low-frequency boosting”. Full article
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13 pages, 4940 KiB  
Article
Effects of Industrial Noise on Physiological Responses
by Massimiliano Masullo, Roxana Adina Toma and Luigi Maffei
Acoustics 2022, 4(3), 733-745; https://doi.org/10.3390/acoustics4030044 - 31 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3753
Abstract
Noise pollution is one of the most common workplace hazards. Noise exposure may induce auditory and extra-auditory physiological and psychological alterations that affect job performance, safety, comfort, and wellbeing. Recent research showed a connection between frequency components of noise and health outcomes, annoyance, [...] Read more.
Noise pollution is one of the most common workplace hazards. Noise exposure may induce auditory and extra-auditory physiological and psychological alterations that affect job performance, safety, comfort, and wellbeing. Recent research showed a connection between frequency components of noise and health outcomes, annoyance, physiological and psychological changes. This study investigated whether and how the activation of different typologies of industrial noises set at three different sound levels induced increases in electrodermal activity (EDA) and the heart rate variations differently. A laboratory listening test was performed for the study, in which 24 subjects were exposed to the activation of different industrial noises: Low Frequency, High Frequency, and Modulated noises at Low, Medium, and High sound levels, while some physiological responses were recorded. The noise stimuli were also evaluated based on a self-report questionnaire. Results show that the EDA variation increases as the Sound Level increases and is higher at HF. In contrast, no relevant changes have been found in RR variation. EDA changes are also related to the perception of the Valence dimension of the noise environment, while RR variations not. The findings of this study emphasized that the changes in EDA depend on the sound levels and frequency content of industrial noise typologies, as well as on the perception of their Valence. Full article
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9 pages, 970 KiB  
Article
A Preliminary Investigation on Frequency Dependant Cues for Human Emotions
by Manish Kumar, Thushara D. Abhayapala and Prasanga Samarasinghe
Acoustics 2022, 4(2), 460-468; https://doi.org/10.3390/acoustics4020028 - 22 May 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 21068
Abstract
The recent advances in Human-Computer Interaction and Artificial Intelligence have significantly increased the importance of identifying human emotions from different sensory cues. Hence, understanding the underlying relationships between emotions and sensory cues have become a subject of study in many fields including Acoustics, [...] Read more.
The recent advances in Human-Computer Interaction and Artificial Intelligence have significantly increased the importance of identifying human emotions from different sensory cues. Hence, understanding the underlying relationships between emotions and sensory cues have become a subject of study in many fields including Acoustics, Psychology, Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Biochemistry. This work is a preliminary step towards investigating cues for human emotion on a fundamental level by aiming to establish relationships between tonal frequencies of sound and emotions. For that, an online perception test is conducted, in which participants are asked to rate the perceived emotions corresponding to each tone. The results show that a crossover point for four primary emotions lies in the frequency range of 417–440 Hz, thus consolidating the hypothesis that the frequency range of 432–440 Hz is neutral from human emotion perspective. It is also observed that the frequency dependant relationships between emotion pairs Happy—Sad, and Anger—Calm are approximately mirrored symmetric in nature. Full article
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