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Developing an Internationalization Strategy Using Diffusion Modeling: The Case of Greater Amberjack

1
Department of Industrial Engineering and Innovation Sciences 1, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
2
Wageningen Economic Research, Wageningen University & Research, 2502 LS The Hague, The Netherlands
3
Department of Management, American College of Greece–Deree, 153 42 Athens, Greece
4
Hellenic Research House, S.A., Athens 161 21, Greece
5
Wageningen Economic Research, Wageningen University & Research, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Fishes 2019, 4(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes4010012
Received: 14 January 2019 / Revised: 6 February 2019 / Accepted: 12 February 2019 / Published: 16 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversification of Aquaculture with New Fish Species)
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Abstract

For farmers of new fish species, market adoption is needed in order to grow a viable business. Farmers may try to sell the new species in their firms’ domestic markets, but they might also look at other markets. However, as markets are becoming more global and competitors more international, considering internationalization may be a necessity rather than a choice. Using diffusion modelling, and based on results of an online supermarket experiment, the innovation and imitation parameters are estimated and diffusion curves for five countries predicted in an attempt to determine the best lead market for introducing fillets of farmed greater amberjack (Seriola dumerili). The production capacity consequences of implementing different internationalization strategies (i.e. “sprinkler” and “waterfall”) were also explored. A waterfall strategy refers to the sequential introduction of a product in different markets, whereas the sprinkler strategy concerns the simultaneous introduction of a product in multiple international markets. Since a sprinkler approach requires many resources and the ability to quickly ramp up production capacity, a waterfall approach appears more suitable for farmers of greater amberjack. Italy and Spain appear to be the best lead markets for greater amberjack farmers to enter first. View Full-Text
Keywords: greater amberjack; forecasting market demand; market diffusion modelling; internationalization strategy greater amberjack; forecasting market demand; market diffusion modelling; internationalization strategy
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Nijssen, E.J.; Reinders, M.J.; Krystallis, A.; Tacken, G. Developing an Internationalization Strategy Using Diffusion Modeling: The Case of Greater Amberjack. Fishes 2019, 4, 12.

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