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Light and Microbial Lifestyle: The Impact of Light Quality on Plant–Microbe Interactions in Horticultural Production Systems—A Review

1
Department of Biosystems and Technology, Microbial Horticulture Unit, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, P.O. Box 103, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden
2
Département de Phytologie, Centre de Recherche et d’Innovation sur les Végétaux (CRIV), Université Laval, Pavillon Envirotron, Local 1216, Québec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
3
Department of Biosystems and Technology, Horticultural Crop Physiology Unit, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, P.O. Box 103, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Horticulturae 2019, 5(2), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5020041
Received: 15 January 2019 / Revised: 15 April 2019 / Accepted: 23 May 2019 / Published: 28 May 2019
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Abstract

Horticultural greenhouse production in circumpolar regions (>60° N latitude), but also at lower latitudes, is dependent on artificial assimilation lighting to improve plant performance and the profitability of ornamental crops, and to secure production of greenhouse vegetables and berries all year round. In order to reduce energy consumption and energy costs, alternative technologies for lighting have been introduced, including light-emitting diodes (LED). This technology is also well-established within urban farming, especially plant factories. Different light technologies influence biotic and abiotic conditions in the plant environment. This review focuses on the impact of light quality on plant–microbe interactions, especially non-phototrophic organisms. Bacterial and fungal pathogens, biocontrol agents, and the phyllobiome are considered. Relevant molecular mechanisms regulating light-quality-related processes in bacteria are described and knowledge gaps are discussed with reference to ecological theories. View Full-Text
Keywords: abiotic factors; biocontrol agent (BCA); controlled environment; ecological theory; greenhouse; molecular mechanisms; non-phototrophic bacteria; pathogens; phyllosphere; plant metabolism; plant morphology abiotic factors; biocontrol agent (BCA); controlled environment; ecological theory; greenhouse; molecular mechanisms; non-phototrophic bacteria; pathogens; phyllosphere; plant metabolism; plant morphology
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Alsanius, B.W.; Karlsson, M.; Rosberg, A.K.; Dorais, M.; Naznin, M.T.; Khalil, S.; Bergstrand, K.-J. Light and Microbial Lifestyle: The Impact of Light Quality on Plant–Microbe Interactions in Horticultural Production Systems—A Review. Horticulturae 2019, 5, 41.

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