Next Article in Journal
Intra-Storm Pattern Recognition through Fuzzy Clustering
Next Article in Special Issue
Calcium and Potassium Nutrition Increases the Water Use Efficiency in Coffee: A Promising Strategy to Adapt to Climate Change
Previous Article in Journal
Pressures and Status of the Riparian Vegetation in Greek Rivers: Overview and Preliminary Assessment
Previous Article in Special Issue
Hydrological Mapping in the Luquillo Experimental Forest: New Local Datum Improves Watershed Ecological Knowledge
Article

Tropical Convection in the Caribbean and Surrounding Region during a Regional, Warming Sea-Surface Temperature Period, 1982–2020

1
NOAA-CESSRST, The City College of New York, 140 Convent Ave., New York, NY 10031, USA
2
NOAA/STAR/SCSB and CISESS/ESSIC, University of Maryland, 5825 University Research CT, Ste 4001, College Park, MD 20740, USA
3
Systems Research Group Inc., NOAA/NWS/NCEP/Weather Prediction Center, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research CT, College Park, MD 20740, USA
4
NOAA/NWS/NCEP/Weather Prediction Center, NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research CT, College Park, MD 20740, USA
5
Mechanical Engineering, The City College of New York, 140 Convent Ave., New York, NY 10031, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Evangelos Baltas
Hydrology 2021, 8(2), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology8020056
Received: 28 February 2021 / Revised: 18 March 2021 / Accepted: 19 March 2021 / Published: 24 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrology in the Caribbean Basin)
Warming sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) have implications for the climate-sensitive Caribbean region, including potential impacts on precipitation. SSTs have been shown to influence deep convection and rainfall, thus understanding the impacts of warming SSTs is important for predicting regional hydrometeorological conditions. This study investigates the long-term annual and seasonal trends in convection using the Galvez-Davison Index (GDI) for tropical convection from 1982–2020. The GDI is used to describe the type and potential for precipitation events characterized by sub-indices that represent heat and moisture availability, cool/warm mid-levels at 500 hPa, and subsidence inversion, which drive the regional Late, Early, and Dry Rainfall Seasons, respectively. Results show that regional SSTs are warming annually and per season, while regionally averaged GDI values are decreasing annually and for the Dry Season. Spatial analyses show the GDI demonstrates higher, statistically significant correlations with precipitation across the region than with sea-surface temperatures, annually and per season. Moreover, the GDI climatology results show that regional convection exhibits a bimodal pattern resembling the characteristic bimodal precipitation pattern experienced in many parts of the Caribbean and surrounding region. However, the drivers of these conditions need further investigation as SSTs continue to rise while the region experiences a drying trend. View Full-Text
Keywords: sea-surface temperature; tropical convection; precipitation; climate change; Caribbean sea-surface temperature; tropical convection; precipitation; climate change; Caribbean
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Glenn, E.; Smith, T.M.; Gálvez, J.M.; Davison, M.; Hibbert, K.; González, J.E. Tropical Convection in the Caribbean and Surrounding Region during a Regional, Warming Sea-Surface Temperature Period, 1982–2020. Hydrology 2021, 8, 56. https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology8020056

AMA Style

Glenn E, Smith TM, Gálvez JM, Davison M, Hibbert K, González JE. Tropical Convection in the Caribbean and Surrounding Region during a Regional, Warming Sea-Surface Temperature Period, 1982–2020. Hydrology. 2021; 8(2):56. https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology8020056

Chicago/Turabian Style

Glenn, Equisha, Thomas M. Smith, Jose M. Gálvez, Michel Davison, Keneshia Hibbert, and Jorge E. González. 2021. "Tropical Convection in the Caribbean and Surrounding Region during a Regional, Warming Sea-Surface Temperature Period, 1982–2020" Hydrology 8, no. 2: 56. https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology8020056

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop