Next Article in Journal
Guggulsterone Activates Adipocyte Beiging through Direct Effects on 3T3-L1 Adipocytes and Indirect Effects Mediated through RAW264.7 Macrophages
Next Article in Special Issue
Green Nanotechnology: Advancement in Phytoformulation Research
Previous Article in Journal
Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Potential, Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities of Cordyceps militaris (L.) Link Fruiting Body
Previous Article in Special Issue
Drug-Loaded Biocompatible Nanocarriers Embedded in Poloxamer 407 Hydrogels as Therapeutic Formulations
Article Menu
Issue 1 (March) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview

Promising Recent Strategies with Potential Clinical Translational Value to Combat Antibacterial Resistant Surge

1
Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
2
Cambrex High Point, Inc., High Point, NC 27265, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Medicines 2019, 6(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines6010021
Received: 6 December 2018 / Revised: 10 January 2019 / Accepted: 26 January 2019 / Published: 31 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticle and Liposome based Novel Drug Delivery Systems)
  |  
PDF [1411 KB, uploaded 31 January 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Multiple drug resistance (MDR) for the treatment of bacterial infection has been a significant challenge since the beginning of the 21st century. Many of the small molecule-based antibiotic treatments have failed on numerous occasions due to a surge in MDR, which has claimed millions of lives worldwide. Small particles (SPs) consisting of metal, polymer or carbon nanoparticles (NPs) of different sizes, shapes and forms have shown considerable antibacterial effect over the past two decades. Unlike the classical small-molecule antibiotics, the small particles are less exposed so far to the bacteria to trigger a resistance mechanism, and hence have higher chances of fighting the challenge of the MDR process. Until recently, there has been limited progress of clinical treatments using NPs, despite ample reports of in vitro antibacterial efficacy. In this review, we discuss some recent and unconventional strategies that have explored the antibacterial efficacy of these small particles, alone and in combination with classical small molecules in vivo, and demonstrate possibilities that are favorable for clinical translations in near future. View Full-Text
Keywords: MDR surge for bacteria; antibiotic nanoparticles; targeted drug delivery; in vivo efficacy; clinical translation MDR surge for bacteria; antibiotic nanoparticles; targeted drug delivery; in vivo efficacy; clinical translation
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Karmakar, P.; Gaitonde, V. Promising Recent Strategies with Potential Clinical Translational Value to Combat Antibacterial Resistant Surge. Medicines 2019, 6, 21.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Medicines EISSN 2305-6320 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top