Next Article in Journal
Modern Methods for Assessing the Quality of Bee Honey and Botanical Origin Identification
Next Article in Special Issue
How Chemical and Sensorial Markers Reflect Gentian Geographic Origin in Chardonnay Wine Macerated with Gentiana lutea Roots?
Previous Article in Journal
Consumer-Based Sensory Characterization of Steviol Glycosides (Rebaudioside A, D, and M)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Effect of Isomixing on Grape Must Fermentations of ATF1–Overexpressing Wine Yeast Strains
Article

Chemical and Sensory Impacts of Accentuated Cut Edges (ACE) Grape Must Polyphenol Extraction Technique on Shiraz Wines

1
Waite Campus, School of Agriculture, Food & Wine, The University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia
2
The Australian Wine Research Institute, Hartley Grove, Urrbrae, Adelaide, SA 5064, Australia
3
Wine Australia, Industry House, Corner Hackney and Botanic Roads, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia
4
Institute for Molecular Biosciences, Goethe University Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(8), 1027; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9081027
Received: 26 June 2020 / Revised: 20 July 2020 / Accepted: 23 July 2020 / Published: 31 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Strategies to Improve Quality of Alcoholic Beverages)
Accentuated Cut Edges (ACE) is a recently developed grape must extraction technique, which mechanically breaks grape skins into small fragments but maintains seed integrity. This study was the first to elucidate the effect of ACE on Shiraz wine’s basic chemical composition, colour, phenolic compounds, polysaccharides and sensory profiles. A further aim was to investigate any potential influence provided by ACE on the pre-fermentation water addition to must. ACE did not visually affect Shiraz wine colour, but significantly enhanced the concentration of tannin and total phenolics. Wine polysaccharide concentration was mainly increased in response to the maceration time rather than the ACE technique. ACE appeared to increase the earthy/dusty flavour, possibly due to the different precursors released by the greater skin breakage. The pre-fermentation addition of the water diluted the wine aromas, flavours and astringency profiles. However, combining the ACE technique with water addition enhanced the wine textural quality by increasing the intensities of the crucial astringent wine quality sub-qualities, adhesive and graininess. Furthermore, insights into the chemical factors influencing the astringency sensations were provided in this study. This research indicates that wine producers may use ACE with pre-fermentation water dilution to reduce the wine alcohol level but maintain important textural components. View Full-Text
Keywords: skin fragmentation; water addition; tannin; phenolics; polysaccharides; rate-all-that-apply; astringent sub-quality; progressive profiling skin fragmentation; water addition; tannin; phenolics; polysaccharides; rate-all-that-apply; astringent sub-quality; progressive profiling
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Kang, W.; Bindon, K.A.; Wang, X.; Muhlack, R.A.; Smith, P.A.; Niimi, J.; Bastian, S.E.P. Chemical and Sensory Impacts of Accentuated Cut Edges (ACE) Grape Must Polyphenol Extraction Technique on Shiraz Wines. Foods 2020, 9, 1027. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9081027

AMA Style

Kang W, Bindon KA, Wang X, Muhlack RA, Smith PA, Niimi J, Bastian SEP. Chemical and Sensory Impacts of Accentuated Cut Edges (ACE) Grape Must Polyphenol Extraction Technique on Shiraz Wines. Foods. 2020; 9(8):1027. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9081027

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kang, Wenyu, Keren A. Bindon, Xingchen Wang, Richard A. Muhlack, Paul A. Smith, Jun Niimi, and Susan E.P. Bastian 2020. "Chemical and Sensory Impacts of Accentuated Cut Edges (ACE) Grape Must Polyphenol Extraction Technique on Shiraz Wines" Foods 9, no. 8: 1027. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9081027

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop