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Article

Identification of Cold Spots Using Non-Destructive Hyperspectral Imaging Technology in Model Food Processed by Coaxially Induced Microwave Pasteurization and Sterilization

1
AgResearch, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
2
School of Food & Advanced Technology, Massey University, Palmerston North 4410, New Zealand
3
New Zealand Food Safety Science Research Centre, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(6), 837; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060837
Received: 11 June 2020 / Accepted: 22 June 2020 / Published: 26 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Novel Thermal Technology in Foods Processing)
The model food in this study known as mashed potato consisted of ribose (1.0%) and lysine (0.5%) to induce browning via Maillard reaction products. Mashed potato was processed by Coaxially Induced Microwave Pasteurization and Sterilization (CiMPAS) regime to generate an F0 of 6–8 min and analysis of the post-processed food was done in two ways, which included by measuring the color changes and using hyperspectral data acquisition. For visualizing the spectra of each tray in comparison with the control sample (raw mashed-potato), the mean spectrum (i.e., mean of region of interest) of each tray, as well as the control sample, was extracted and then fed to the fitted principal component analysis model and the results coincided with those post hoc analysis of the average reflectance values. Despite the presence of a visual difference in browning, the Lightness (L) values were not significantly (p < 0.05) different to detect a cold spot among a range of 12 processed samples. At the same time, hyperspectral imaging could identify the colder trays among the 12 samples from one batch of microwave sterilization. View Full-Text
Keywords: hyperspectral imaging; cold spots; microwave; sterilization; Maillard reaction hyperspectral imaging; cold spots; microwave; sterilization; Maillard reaction
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MDPI and ACS Style

Soni, A.; Al-Sarayreh, M.; Reis, M.M.; Smith, J.; Tong, K.; Brightwell, G. Identification of Cold Spots Using Non-Destructive Hyperspectral Imaging Technology in Model Food Processed by Coaxially Induced Microwave Pasteurization and Sterilization. Foods 2020, 9, 837. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060837

AMA Style

Soni A, Al-Sarayreh M, Reis MM, Smith J, Tong K, Brightwell G. Identification of Cold Spots Using Non-Destructive Hyperspectral Imaging Technology in Model Food Processed by Coaxially Induced Microwave Pasteurization and Sterilization. Foods. 2020; 9(6):837. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060837

Chicago/Turabian Style

Soni, Aswathi, Mahmoud Al-Sarayreh, Marlon M. Reis, Jeremy Smith, Kris Tong, and Gale Brightwell. 2020. "Identification of Cold Spots Using Non-Destructive Hyperspectral Imaging Technology in Model Food Processed by Coaxially Induced Microwave Pasteurization and Sterilization" Foods 9, no. 6: 837. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060837

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