Next Article in Journal
Spectroscopic and Molecular Modeling Investigation on the Interaction between Folic Acid and Bovine Lactoferrin from Encapsulation Perspectives
Next Article in Special Issue
Application of Analytical Chemistry to Foods and Food Technology
Previous Article in Journal
Consumer Awareness, Attitudes and Preferences Towards Heritage Cereals
Previous Article in Special Issue
Hydrocolloid-Based Coatings with Nanoparticles and Transglutaminase Crosslinker as Innovative Strategy to Produce Healthier Fried Kobbah
Article

A Cross-Flow Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Curcuminoids from Curcuma longa L.: Process Design to Avoid Degradation

1
Dipartimento di Scienza e Tecnologia del Farmaco, University of Turin, Via P. Giuria 9, 10125 Turin, Italy
2
INDENA S.pA., Viale Ortles, 12, 20139 Milan, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(6), 743; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060743
Received: 9 May 2020 / Revised: 28 May 2020 / Accepted: 2 June 2020 / Published: 4 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Analytical Chemistry to Foods and Food Technology)
Rhizomes of Curcuma longa L. are well known for their content of curcuminoids, which are compounds with interesting biological activity against various inflammatory states and diseases. Curcuminoids can degrade during processing. This piece of work investigates fast, efficient and cost-effective metabolite recovery from turmeric under ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE). An analytical evaluation of curcuminoid stability under sonication in different solvents is reported for the first time. HPLC and quantitative 1H-NMR were used. Under the applied conditions, EtOAc was found to be the optimal extraction medium, rather than EtOH, due to its lower radical generation, which facilitates better curcuminoid stability. Kinetic characterization, by means of the Peleg equation, was applied for single-step UAE on two different rhizome granulometries. Over a time of 90 min, maximum extraction yields were 25.63% and 47.56% for 6 and 2 mm matrix powders, respectively. However, it was observed that the largest portion of curcuminoid recovery was achieved in the first 30 min. Model outcomes were used as the basis for the design of a suitable multi-step cross-flow approach that supports and emphasizes the disruptive role of cavitation. The maximum curcuminoid yield was achieved over three steps (92.10%) and four steps (80.04%), for lower and higher granulometries, respectively. Finally, the central role of the solvent was further confirmed by turmeric oleoresin purification. The EtOAc extract was purified via crystallization, and a 95% pure curcuminoid product was isolated without any chromatographic procedure. No suitable crystallization was observed for the EtOH extract. View Full-Text
Keywords: Curcuma longa L.; curcuminoid stability; multi-step extraction; ultrasound-assisted extraction; extraction kinetic Curcuma longa L.; curcuminoid stability; multi-step extraction; ultrasound-assisted extraction; extraction kinetic
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Binello, A.; Grillo, G.; Barge, A.; Allegrini, P.; Ciceri, D.; Cravotto, G. A Cross-Flow Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Curcuminoids from Curcuma longa L.: Process Design to Avoid Degradation. Foods 2020, 9, 743. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060743

AMA Style

Binello A, Grillo G, Barge A, Allegrini P, Ciceri D, Cravotto G. A Cross-Flow Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Curcuminoids from Curcuma longa L.: Process Design to Avoid Degradation. Foods. 2020; 9(6):743. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060743

Chicago/Turabian Style

Binello, Arianna, Giorgio Grillo, Alessandro Barge, Pietro Allegrini, Daniele Ciceri, and Giancarlo Cravotto. 2020. "A Cross-Flow Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Curcuminoids from Curcuma longa L.: Process Design to Avoid Degradation" Foods 9, no. 6: 743. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060743

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop