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Article

Evaluating the Chemical Components and Flavor Characteristics Responsible for Triggering the Perception of “Beer Flavor” in Non-Alcoholic Beer

1
Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California Davis, 595 Hilgard Lane, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2
Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California Davis, 392 Old Davis Rd, Davis, CA 95616, USA
3
Versuchs- und Lehranstalt für Brauerei in Berlin (VLB) e.V., Seestrasse 13, 13353 Berlin, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1914; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121914
Received: 24 November 2020 / Revised: 16 December 2020 / Accepted: 17 December 2020 / Published: 21 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Wine, Brewing, Analysis and Grape-Derived Products)
Forty-two commercial non-alcoholic beer (NAB) brands were analyzed using sensory and chemical techniques to understand which analytes and/or flavors were most responsible for invoking the perception of “beer flavor” (for Northern Californian consumers). The aroma and taste profiles of the commercial NABs, a commercial soda, and a carbonated seltzer water (n = 44) were characterized using replicated descriptive and CATA analyses performed by a trained sensory panel (i.e., 11 panelists). A number of non-volatile and volatile techniques were then used to chemically deconstruct the products. Consumer analysis (i.e., 129 Northern Californian consumers) was also used to evaluate a selection of these NABs (i.e., 12) and how similar they thought the aroma, taste and mouthfeels of these products were to beer, soda, and water. The results show that certain constituents drive the aroma and taste profiles which are responsible for invoking beer perception for these North American consumers. Further, beer likeness might not be a driver of preference in this diverse beverage class for Northern Californian consumers. These are important insights for brewers planning to create products for similar markets and/or more broadly for companies interested in designing other functional/alternative food and beverage products. View Full-Text
Keywords: non-alcoholic beer (NAB); sensory and chemical analyses; consumer science; beer flavor non-alcoholic beer (NAB); sensory and chemical analyses; consumer science; beer flavor
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lafontaine, S.; Senn, K.; Knoke, L.; Schubert, C.; Dennenlöhr, J.; Maxminer, J.; Cantu, A.; Rettberg, N.; Heymann, H. Evaluating the Chemical Components and Flavor Characteristics Responsible for Triggering the Perception of “Beer Flavor” in Non-Alcoholic Beer. Foods 2020, 9, 1914. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121914

AMA Style

Lafontaine S, Senn K, Knoke L, Schubert C, Dennenlöhr J, Maxminer J, Cantu A, Rettberg N, Heymann H. Evaluating the Chemical Components and Flavor Characteristics Responsible for Triggering the Perception of “Beer Flavor” in Non-Alcoholic Beer. Foods. 2020; 9(12):1914. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121914

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lafontaine, Scott, Kay Senn, Laura Knoke, Christian Schubert, Johanna Dennenlöhr, Jörg Maxminer, Annegret Cantu, Nils Rettberg, and Hildegarde Heymann. 2020. "Evaluating the Chemical Components and Flavor Characteristics Responsible for Triggering the Perception of “Beer Flavor” in Non-Alcoholic Beer" Foods 9, no. 12: 1914. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121914

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