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Open AccessArticle

Predesign Considerations for the DC Link Voltage Level of the CENTRELINE Fuselage Fan Drive Unit

by Stefan Biser 1,2,*,†, Guido Wortmann 1,†, Swen Ruppert 3,†, Mykhaylo Filipenko 1,†, Mathias Noe 2 and Martin Boll 1,†
1
Rolls-Royce Limited & Co. KG, Willy-Messerschmitt-Str. 1, 82024 Taufkirchen, Germany
2
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology—Institute of Technical Physics, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Leopoldshafen-Eggenstein, Germany
3
Siemens AG, Anton-Bruckner-Str. 2, 91052 Erlangen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Aerospace 2019, 6(12), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace6120126
Received: 2 October 2019 / Revised: 13 November 2019 / Accepted: 14 November 2019 / Published: 20 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 9th EASN International Conference on Innovation in Aviation & Space)
Electric propulsion (EP) systems offer considerably more degrees of freedom (DOFs) within the design process of aircraft compared to conventional aircraft engines. This requires large, computationally expensive design space explorations (DSE) with coupled models of the single components to incorporate interdependencies during optimization. The purpose of this paper is to exemplarily study these interdependencies of system key performance parameters (KPIs), e.g., system mass and efficiency, for a varying DC link voltage level of the power transmission system considering the example of the propulsion system of the CENTRELINE project, including an electric motor, a DC/AC inverter, and the DC power transmission cables. Each component is described by a physically derived, analytical model linking specific subdomains, e.g., electromagnetics, structural mechanics and thermal analysis, which are used for a coupled system model. This approach strongly enhances model accuracy and simultaneously keeps the computational effort at a low level. The results of the DSE reveal that the system KPIs improve for higher DC link voltage despite slightly inferior performance of motor and inverter as the mass of the DC power transmission cable has a major share for a an aircraft of the size as in the CENTRELINE project. Modeling of further components and implementation of optimization strategies will be part of future work. View Full-Text
Keywords: electric propulsion; aircraft; CENTRELINE; DC link voltage level; analytical model; design space exploration electric propulsion; aircraft; CENTRELINE; DC link voltage level; analytical model; design space exploration
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Biser, S.; Wortmann, G.; Ruppert, S.; Filipenko, M.; Noe, M.; Boll, M. Predesign Considerations for the DC Link Voltage Level of the CENTRELINE Fuselage Fan Drive Unit. Aerospace 2019, 6, 126.

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