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Open AccessArticle

Interaction between Bean and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides: Understanding Through a Biochemical Approach

1
Department of Botany, Scottish Church College, Kolkata 700006, India
2
Molecular and Applied Mycology and Plant Pathology Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of Calcutta, Kolkata 700019, India
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2019, 8(9), 345; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8090345
Received: 19 June 2019 / Revised: 31 August 2019 / Accepted: 9 September 2019 / Published: 12 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactions between Colletotrichum Species and Plants)
In addition to its role in animals, nowadays nitric oxide (NO) is considered as an emerging signaling molecule in plant systems. It is now believed that NO exerts its pivotal role in various plant physiological processes, such as in seed germination, plant developmental stages, and plant defense mechanisms. In this study, we have taken an initiative to show the biochemical basis of defense response activation in bean leaves during the progression of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Penz.) Penz. and Sacc. in detached bean leaves. Stages of pathogen penetration and colonization were successfully established in the detached bean leaves. Results showed up-regulation of different defense-related enzymes and other defense molecules, such as phenols, flavonoids, callose, and lignin molecules, along with NO at early stages of pathogen invasion. Although in the later stages of the disease, development of NO and other defense components (excluding lignin) were down-regulated, the production of reactive oxygen species in the form of H2O2 became elevated. Consequently, other stress markers, such as lipid peroxidation, proline content, and chlorophyll content, were changed accordingly. Correlation between the disease index and other defense molecules, along with NO, indicate that production of NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS) might influence the development of anthracnose in common bean. View Full-Text
Keywords: defense enzymes; disease progression; lignin; lipid peroxidation rate; nitric oxide; proline content defense enzymes; disease progression; lignin; lipid peroxidation rate; nitric oxide; proline content
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Chakraborty, N.; Mukherjee, K.; Sarkar, A.; Acharya, K. Interaction between Bean and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides: Understanding Through a Biochemical Approach. Plants 2019, 8, 345.

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