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Article

Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Calendula officinalis L. Flower Extract

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Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Drug Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
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UCIBIO/REQUIMTE, MedTech, Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Drug Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
3
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3004-531 Coimbra, Portugal
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Center for Neurosciences and Cell Biology, 3004-504 Coimbra, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Enzo Berardesca
Cosmetics 2021, 8(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8020031
Received: 8 April 2021 / Revised: 22 April 2021 / Accepted: 23 April 2021 / Published: 25 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Cosmetics in 2021)
The use of calendula for its lenitive properties’ dates to the XII century. This plant contains several bioactive compounds, including terpenoids, terpenes, carotenoids, flavonoids and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Calendula flower extract is used in soothing cosmetics, such as after-sun, sensitive skin and eye contour products. The anti-inflammatory properties of this ingredient were demonstrated in an animal model, but the mechanism of action is poorly understood. Therefore, our work explored the effect of a calendula flower extract on NO production, a pro-inflammatory radical produced by nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and highly released by innate immune cells in inflammatory-related pathologies. NO production was evoked by the Toll-like receptor 4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in macrophages, using concentrations that did not compromise cells viability. This ingredient exhibited a dose-dependent NO inhibition, reaching 50% at 147 μL/mL without cytotoxicity. Together with previous literature, these results provide experimental evidence on the anti-inflammatory properties of calendula flower extract, as well as its usefulness in cosmetics with soothing properties and adjunctive skin care in the treatment of the diseases associated with dysregulation of the NO signaling cascade. View Full-Text
Keywords: calendula; anti-inflammatory; NO; skin care; iNOS; soothing cosmetics calendula; anti-inflammatory; NO; skin care; iNOS; soothing cosmetics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Silva, D.; Ferreira, M.S.; Sousa-Lobo, J.M.; Cruz, M.T.; Almeida, I.F. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Calendula officinalis L. Flower Extract. Cosmetics 2021, 8, 31. https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8020031

AMA Style

Silva D, Ferreira MS, Sousa-Lobo JM, Cruz MT, Almeida IF. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Calendula officinalis L. Flower Extract. Cosmetics. 2021; 8(2):31. https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8020031

Chicago/Turabian Style

Silva, Diva, Marta S. Ferreira, José M. Sousa-Lobo, Maria T. Cruz, and Isabel F. Almeida. 2021. "Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Calendula officinalis L. Flower Extract" Cosmetics 8, no. 2: 31. https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8020031

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