Next Article in Journal
NH3 Plasma-Treated Magnesium Doped Zinc Oxide in Biomedical Sensors with Electrolyte–Insulator–Semiconductor (EIS) Structure for Urea and Glucose Applications
Previous Article in Journal
High Density Display of an Anti-Angiogenic Peptide on Micelle Surfaces Enhances Their Inhibition of αvβ3 Integrin-Mediated Neovascularization In Vitro
Previous Article in Special Issue
[email protected] Nanoparticles Functionalized with Oligonucleotides: A Prominent Tool for the Detection of the Methylated Reprimo Gene in Gastric Cancer by Dynamic Light Scattering
Open AccessArticle

Potential of Polymeric Films Loaded with Gold Nanorods for Local Hyperthermia Applications

1
School of Pharmacy, Queen’s University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK
2
School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 5AG, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(3), 582; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10030582
Received: 27 February 2020 / Revised: 17 March 2020 / Accepted: 20 March 2020 / Published: 23 March 2020
Current strategies for the treatment of superficial non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) lesions include topical imoquimod, 5-fluorouracil, and photodynamic therapy. Although these treatments are effective, burning pain, blistering, and dermatitis have been reported as frequent side effects, making these therapies far from ideal. Plasmonic materials have been investigated for the induction of hyperthermia and use in cancer treatment. In this sense, the effectiveness of intratumorally and systemically injected gold nanorods (GnRs) in inducing cancer cell death upon near-infrared light irradiation has been confirmed. However, the in vivo long-term toxicity of these particles has not yet been fully documented. In the present manuscript, GnRs were included in a crosslinked polymeric film, evaluating their mechanical, swelling, and adhesion properties; moreover, their ability to heat up neonatal porcine skin (such as a skin model) upon irradiation was tested. Inclusion of GnRs into the films did not affect mechanical or swelling properties. GnRs were not released after film swelling, as they remained entrapped in the polymeric network; moreover, films did not adhere to porcine skin, altogether showing the enhanced biocompatibility of the material. GnR-loaded films were able to heat up the skin model over 40 °C, confirming the potential of this system for non-invasive local hyperthermia applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: non-melanoma skin cancer; hyperthermia; gold nanorods; polymeric films; near infrared light; heating studies non-melanoma skin cancer; hyperthermia; gold nanorods; polymeric films; near infrared light; heating studies
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Cárcamo-Martínez, Á.; Domínguez-Robles, J.; Mallon, B.; Raman, M.T.; Cordeiro, A.S.; Bell, S.E.J.; Larrañeta, E.; Donnelly, R.F. Potential of Polymeric Films Loaded with Gold Nanorods for Local Hyperthermia Applications. Nanomaterials 2020, 10, 582.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop