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J. Intell., Volume 2, Issue 4 (December 2014) – 3 articles , Pages 122-196

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Cultural Perceptions of Human Intelligence
J. Intell. 2014, 2(4), 180-196; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence2040180 - 18 Dec 2014
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 7685
Abstract
This paper analyzes notions of culture and human intelligence. Drawing on implicit and explicit theory frameworks, I explore discourses about perceptions of intelligence and culture. These include cultural perceptions and meanings of intelligence in Asia, Africa and Western cultures. While there is little [...] Read more.
This paper analyzes notions of culture and human intelligence. Drawing on implicit and explicit theory frameworks, I explore discourses about perceptions of intelligence and culture. These include cultural perceptions and meanings of intelligence in Asia, Africa and Western cultures. While there is little consensus on what intelligence really means from one culture to the next, the literature suggests that the culture or sub culture of an individual will determine how intelligence is conceived. In conclusion, the view is that culture and intelligence are interwoven. Full article
Open AccessArticle
An Investigation of Growth Mixture Models for Studying the Flynn Effect
J. Intell. 2014, 2(4), 156-179; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence2040156 - 16 Oct 2014
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4199
Abstract
The Flynn effect (FE) is the well-documented generational increase of mean IQ scores over time, but a methodological issue that has not received much attention in the FE literature is the heterogeneity in change patterns across time. Growth mixture models (GMMs) offer researchers [...] Read more.
The Flynn effect (FE) is the well-documented generational increase of mean IQ scores over time, but a methodological issue that has not received much attention in the FE literature is the heterogeneity in change patterns across time. Growth mixture models (GMMs) offer researchers a flexible latent variable framework for examining the potential heterogeneity of change patterns. The article presents: (1) a Monte Carlo investigation of the performance of the various measures of model fit for GMMs in data that resemble previous FE studies; and (2) an application of GMM to the National Intelligence Tests. The Monte Carlo study supported the use of the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) and consistent Akaike information criterion (CAIC) for model selection. The GMM application study resulted in the identification of two classes of participants that had unique change patterns across three time periods. Our studies show that GMMs, when applied carefully, are likely to identify homogeneous subpopulations in FE studies, which may aid in further understanding of the FE. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Methodological Advances in Understanding the Flynn Effect)
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Open AccessArticle
Future Efforts in Flynn Effect Research: Balancing Reductionism with Holism
J. Intell. 2014, 2(4), 122-155; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence2040122 - 15 Oct 2014
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 4381
Abstract
After nearly thirty years of concerted effort by many investigators, the cause or causes of the secular gains in IQ test scores, known as the Flynn effect, remain elusive. In this target article, I offer six suggestions as to how we might proceed [...] Read more.
After nearly thirty years of concerted effort by many investigators, the cause or causes of the secular gains in IQ test scores, known as the Flynn effect, remain elusive. In this target article, I offer six suggestions as to how we might proceed in our efforts to solve this intractable mystery. The suggestions are as follows: (1) compare parents to children; (2) consider other traits and conditions; (3) compare siblings; (4) conduct more and better intervention programs; (5) use subtest profile data in context; and (6) quantify the potential contribution of heterosis. This last section contains new simulations of the process of heterosis, which provide a plausible scenario whereby rapid secular changes in multiple genetically influenced traits are possible. If there is any theme to the present paper, it is that future study designs should be simpler and more highly focused, coordinating multiple studies on single populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Methodological Advances in Understanding the Flynn Effect)
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