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Open AccessArticle

Changes in the Antioxidant Properties of Extra Virgin Olive Oil after Cooking Typical Mediterranean Vegetables

1
Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pharmacy Faculty UGR, Campus Cartuja s/n, C.P. 10871 Granada, Spain
2
Department of Nature Sciences, Centro Universitario del Sur (UdeG), Av. Enrique Arreola Silva 883, Ciudad Guzmán C.P. 49000, Jalisco, Mexico
3
Department of Computational Sciences and Technological Innovation, Centro Universitario del Sur (UdeG), Av. Enrique Arreola Silva 883, Ciudad Guzmán C.P. 49000, Jalisco, México
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antioxidants 2019, 8(8), 246; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox8080246
Received: 27 June 2019 / Revised: 18 July 2019 / Accepted: 22 July 2019 / Published: 26 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants in Olive Oils)
Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), water, and a water/oil mixture (W/O) were used for frying, boiling and sautéeing Mediterranean vegetables (potato, pumpkin, tomato and eggplant). Differences in antioxidant capacity (AC) (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), ferric iron (FRAP), 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbensothiazoline)-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS)), total phenolic content (TPC) and individual phenols (high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)) in unused and used EVOO and water were determined. The water used to boil tomatoes showed the highest TPC value, whilst the lowest was found in the EVOO from the W/O used for boiling potatoes. After processing, the concentrations of phenols exclusive to EVOO diminished to different extents. There was a greater transfer of phenols from the vegetable to the oil when eggplant, tomato and pumpkin were cooked. W/O boiling enriched the water for most of the phenols analysed, such as chlorogenic acid and phenols exclusive to EVOO. The values of AC decreased or were maintained when fresh oil was used to cook the vegetables (raw > frying > sautéing > boiling). The water fraction was enriched in 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8–tetramethyl-chroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox) equivalents following boiling, though to a greater extent when EVOO was added. Phenolic content and AC of EVOO decreased after cooking Mediterranean diet vegetables. Further, water was enriched after the boiling processes, particularly when oil was included. View Full-Text
Keywords: fry; boil; phenolic compounds; antioxidant capacity; extra virgin olive oil; mediterranean vegetables fry; boil; phenolic compounds; antioxidant capacity; extra virgin olive oil; mediterranean vegetables
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ramírez-Anaya, J.P.; Castañeda-Saucedo, M.C.; Olalla-Herrera, M.; Villalón-Mir, M.; Serrana, H. .-G.; Samaniego-Sánchez, C. Changes in the Antioxidant Properties of Extra Virgin Olive Oil after Cooking Typical Mediterranean Vegetables. Antioxidants 2019, 8, 246.

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