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Open AccessArticle

Antibiotic Treatment in Anopheles coluzzii Affects Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism

1
Microbiota of Insect Vectors Group, Institut Pasteur de Guyane, 97306 Cayenne, French Guiana
2
Ecole Doctorale Numéro 587, Diversités, Santé, et Développement en Amazonie, Université de Guyane, 97337 Cayenne, French Guiana
3
Tropical Biome and Immunophysiopathology, Université de Guyane, 97300 Cayenne, French Guiana
4
Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Roehampton, London SW15 4JD, UK
5
Univ. Lille, CNRS, Inserm, CHU Lille, Institut Pasteur de Lille, U1019—UMR9017—CIIL—Center for Infection and Immunity of Lille, F-59000 Lille, France
6
Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BU, UK
7
Department of Parasites and Insect Vectors, Institut Pasteur, 75015 Paris, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Co-Last Authors.
Pathogens 2020, 9(9), 679; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9090679
Received: 15 July 2020 / Revised: 13 August 2020 / Accepted: 17 August 2020 / Published: 21 August 2020
The mosquito microbiota reduces the vector competence of Anopheles to Plasmodium and affects host fitness; it is therefore considered as a potential target to reduce malaria transmission. While immune induction, secretion of antimicrobials and metabolic competition are three typical mechanisms of microbiota-mediated protection against invasive pathogens in mammals, the involvement of metabolic competition or mutualism in mosquito-microbiota and microbiota-Plasmodium interactions has not been investigated. Here, we describe a metabolome analysis of the midgut of Anopheles coluzzii provided with a sugar-meal or a non-infectious blood-meal, under conventional or antibiotic-treated conditions. We observed that the antibiotic treatment affects the tricarboxylic acid cycle and nitrogen metabolism, notably resulting in decreased abundance of free amino acids. Linking our results with published data, we identified pathways which may participate in microbiota-Plasmodium interactions via metabolic interactions or immune modulation and thus would be interesting candidates for future functional studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: mosquito; microbiota; malaria; metabolism; immunity; tricarboxylic acid cycle; nitrogen excretion; amino acids mosquito; microbiota; malaria; metabolism; immunity; tricarboxylic acid cycle; nitrogen excretion; amino acids
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chabanol, E.; Behrends, V.; Prévot, G.; Christophides, G.K.; Gendrin, M. Antibiotic Treatment in Anopheles coluzzii Affects Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism. Pathogens 2020, 9, 679. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9090679

AMA Style

Chabanol E, Behrends V, Prévot G, Christophides GK, Gendrin M. Antibiotic Treatment in Anopheles coluzzii Affects Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism. Pathogens. 2020; 9(9):679. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9090679

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chabanol, Estelle; Behrends, Volker; Prévot, Ghislaine; Christophides, George K.; Gendrin, Mathilde. 2020. "Antibiotic Treatment in Anopheles coluzzii Affects Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism" Pathogens 9, no. 9: 679. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9090679

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