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Laws, Volume 7, Issue 4 (December 2018)

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Open AccessComment A Counterfactual Impact Analysis of Fair Use Policy on Copyright Related Industries in Singapore: A Critical Review
Received: 28 July 2016 / Revised: 18 October 2016 / Accepted: 12 September 2018 / Published: 5 October 2018
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Abstract
In a 2014 article appearing in Laws, Ghafele and Gibert presented evidence on the economic impacts of Singapore’s change in its fair use policies showing a large effect on industries that manufacture goods useful for private copying of copyrighted works and no
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In a 2014 article appearing in Laws, Ghafele and Gibert presented evidence on the economic impacts of Singapore’s change in its fair use policies showing a large effect on industries that manufacture goods useful for private copying of copyrighted works and no effect on the copyright industries. As detailed in this Comment, Ghafele and Gibert’s empirical analysis fails to shed light on the consequences of modifications to fair use policies. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Who’s Talking About Us Without Us? A Survivor Research Interjection into an Academic Psychiatry Debate on Compulsory Community Treatment Orders in Ireland
Received: 7 August 2018 / Revised: 14 September 2018 / Accepted: 18 September 2018 / Published: 25 September 2018
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Abstract
This paper presents a user/survivor researcher perspective to the debate among psychiatrists on the suggested introduction of Community Treatment Orders in Ireland. Critical questions are raised about evidence and the construction of psychiatric knowledge. Important questions include: How is this evidence created? What
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This paper presents a user/survivor researcher perspective to the debate among psychiatrists on the suggested introduction of Community Treatment Orders in Ireland. Critical questions are raised about evidence and the construction of psychiatric knowledge. Important questions include: How is this evidence created? What and whose knowledge have not been considered? Some critical issues around coercion, ‘insight’, and attributions of ‘lack of capacity’ are briefly considered. Further legal considerations are then introduced based on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability. The paper concludes with a human rights-based appeal to reject the introduction of coercive community treatment in Ireland. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Concerns, Contradictions and Reality of Mental Health Law)
Open AccessArticle Are Immigrant Women Visible in Australian Domestic Violence Reports that Potentially Influence Policy?
Received: 22 June 2018 / Revised: 10 September 2018 / Accepted: 14 September 2018 / Published: 21 September 2018
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Through an intersectional lens, this article explores whether immigrant women are represented in a sample of Australian government documents aimed at providing information about family violence in Australia, and discusses implications for policy development. The authors find that while these documents pay lip
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Through an intersectional lens, this article explores whether immigrant women are represented in a sample of Australian government documents aimed at providing information about family violence in Australia, and discusses implications for policy development. The authors find that while these documents pay lip service to the special vulnerabilities of immigrant and refugee women; arguably, they do not engage with the complexities of the intersection of gender and other social categories. Given that the reports do not focus adequately on how race, ethnicity, culture and immigration status play a role in these women’s experiences of domestic violence, this may limit the effect of policies that address the culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) victims’ needs and rights to protection. We argue that a more intersectional approach is necessary to address CALD women’s specific needs. Full article
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