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Article

Potential Impacts of Soil Tillage System on Isoflavone Concentration of Soybean as Functional Food Ingredients

1
Diet, Genomics and Immunology Laboratory, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA
2
Institute of Advanced Horticulture Research of Transylvania, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Manastur St. 3-5, 400372 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
3
AgroTransilvania Cluster, Dezmir, Crișeni FN, 407039 Dezmir, Romania
4
University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Mănăştur St.3-5, 400372 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Land 2020, 9(10), 386; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9100386
Received: 3 September 2020 / Revised: 8 October 2020 / Accepted: 9 October 2020 / Published: 12 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Tillage Systems and Conservative Agriculture)
Soybean is an important natural source of isoflavones, but their concentration is likely to be influenced by external factors, such as climatic conditions and soil tillage systems. However, there is minimal information about the effects of such external factors on the isoflavone concentration in soybeans grown in Europe. Therefore, in this study, field experiments were established in Romania to investigate the potential impacts of three different soil tillage systems—conventional, minimum tillage and no-tillage—on crop yields and the isoflavone concentration of soybeans for three experimental years, 2014–2016. Our experimental results indicated that the soil tillage systems had little impact on the soybean yields each year. However, the 2016 yield was found to be higher than the 2014 and 2015 yields under all three soil systems. For every experimental year, the higher yield was recorded by the conventional system, followed by the minimum tillage system and no-tillage system under first weed control (weed control two (wct2): S-metolaclor 960 g/L, imazamox 40 g/L and propaquizafop 100 g/L). Likewise, the soil tillage system did not have a significant influence on the total isoflavone concentrations. Nevertheless, we noticed some variations in the individual isoflavone concentration (daidzin, genistin, glycitin, daidzein, genistein) in each year. Altogether, the minimum tillage and no-tillage systems may be employed as a suitable soil tillage system in soybean farming without an impact on the total isoflavone. View Full-Text
Keywords: isoflavone concentrations; soybean; HPLC; minimum tillage; no-tillage isoflavone concentrations; soybean; HPLC; minimum tillage; no-tillage
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mureșan, L.; Clapa, D.; Borsai, O.; Rusu, T.; Wang, T.T.Y.; Park, J.B. Potential Impacts of Soil Tillage System on Isoflavone Concentration of Soybean as Functional Food Ingredients. Land 2020, 9, 386. https://doi.org/10.3390/land9100386

AMA Style

Mureșan L, Clapa D, Borsai O, Rusu T, Wang TTY, Park JB. Potential Impacts of Soil Tillage System on Isoflavone Concentration of Soybean as Functional Food Ingredients. Land. 2020; 9(10):386. https://doi.org/10.3390/land9100386

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mureșan, Liliana, Doina Clapa, Orsolya Borsai, Teodor Rusu, Thomas T.Y. Wang, and Jae B. Park 2020. "Potential Impacts of Soil Tillage System on Isoflavone Concentration of Soybean as Functional Food Ingredients" Land 9, no. 10: 386. https://doi.org/10.3390/land9100386

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