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Open AccessArticle

The Cloud Nucleating Properties and Mixing State of Marine Aerosols Sampled along the Southern California Coast

1
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
2
Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL 33149, USA
3
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current Address: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.
Current Address: Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H6, Canada.
§
Current Address: Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354, USA.
Atmosphere 2018, 9(2), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9020052
Received: 30 November 2017 / Revised: 31 January 2018 / Accepted: 2 February 2018 / Published: 6 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Aerosol Composition and its Impact on Clouds)
Marine aerosols are a globally significant contributor to aerosol-cloud-climate interactions; however, the impact that different sources of pollution and natural emissions from the ocean have on the water uptake properties of marine aerosols remains largely underexplored. Here we present measurements of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation of marine aerosols taken in a coastal, marine environment impacted by sea spray aerosol and different sources of pollution. The hygroscopicity parameter, κ, was found to range from <0.1 up to 1.4 with a campaign-average value of 0.22 ± 0.12. Smaller particles were less hygroscopic than larger ones, and κ varied diurnally and temporally as a function of air mass transport conditions. Measurements made using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) revealed that heterogeneous reactions, sulfates, and temporal differences in the observed particle types had the largest impacts on the observed κ values. The aerosol mixing-state was also found to affect κ. Temporal differences between freshly-emitted soot and aged soot internally mixed with sulfates, likely emitted from ships, had the largest impact on diurnal variations in κ. Our results further demonstrate the significant impact that pollution and the aerosol mixing-state have on aerosol-cloud interactions in the marine boundary layer. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aerosol; hygroscopicity; mixing state; marine; polluted; aging; mass spectrometry Aerosol; hygroscopicity; mixing state; marine; polluted; aging; mass spectrometry
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Gaston, C.J.; Cahill, J.F.; Collins, D.B.; Suski, K.J.; Ge, J.Y.; Barkley, A.E.; Prather, K.A. The Cloud Nucleating Properties and Mixing State of Marine Aerosols Sampled along the Southern California Coast. Atmosphere 2018, 9, 52.

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Atmosphere, EISSN 2073-4433, Published by MDPI AG
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