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Article

Changes in Agronomic and Physiological Traits of Sugarcane Grown with Saline Irrigation Water

Faculty of Agriculture, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan
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Agronomy 2020, 10(5), 722; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10050722
Received: 13 April 2020 / Revised: 14 May 2020 / Accepted: 15 May 2020 / Published: 18 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue How Plants Perceive Salt during the Irrigation)
In Japan, the highest salt concentration in irrigation water for sugarcane cultivation has been reported to be above 2500 mg L−1, which may cause harmful effects to the crops; however, little information is available on the relationship between the salinity of irrigation water and sugarcane. To investigate its effects on agronomic and physiological traits, a Japanese cultivar, Saccharum spp cv. NiF8, was grown with 0, 200, 500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 mg NaCl L−1 under pot conditions. The treatments significantly lowered leaf area; however, NaCl levels up to 500 mg L−1 did not greatly reduce culm weight and juice sugar concentration. These traits were impaired when the tested cultivar was grown with 1000 mg NaCl L−1 or higher, indicating that salt concentration is desired to be lower than 1000 mg L−1. CO2 assimilation rate was inhibited mainly due to stomatal closure caused by salt stress. The treatments significantly altered Na+, Cl, and K+ concentrations in juice but not those in leaf, suggesting that juice analysis is an effective method to estimate its salinization status. Culm weight and juice sugar concentration were severely affected as juice conductivity exceeded 900 mS m−1; thereby, sugarcane plants of NiF8 possessing conductivity above this level could be considered salt-stressed where water salinity is a concern. View Full-Text
Keywords: sugarcane; saline irrigation water; photosynthesis; ion composition; electrical conductivity sugarcane; saline irrigation water; photosynthesis; ion composition; electrical conductivity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Watanabe, K.; Takaragawa, H.; Ueno, M.; Kawamitsu, Y. Changes in Agronomic and Physiological Traits of Sugarcane Grown with Saline Irrigation Water. Agronomy 2020, 10, 722. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10050722

AMA Style

Watanabe K, Takaragawa H, Ueno M, Kawamitsu Y. Changes in Agronomic and Physiological Traits of Sugarcane Grown with Saline Irrigation Water. Agronomy. 2020; 10(5):722. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10050722

Chicago/Turabian Style

Watanabe, Kenta, Hiroo Takaragawa, Masami Ueno, and Yoshinobu Kawamitsu. 2020. "Changes in Agronomic and Physiological Traits of Sugarcane Grown with Saline Irrigation Water" Agronomy 10, no. 5: 722. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10050722

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