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Open AccessArticle

Caseinate-Stabilized Emulsions of Black Cumin and Tamanu Oils: Preparation, Characterization and Antibacterial Activity

1
Department of Fat, Surfactant and Cosmetics Technology, Faculty of Technology, Tomas Bata University in Zlín, nám. T. G. Masaryka 5555, 760 01 Zlín, Czech Republic
2
Centre of Polymer Systems, Tomas Bata University in Zlín, nám. T. G. Masaryka 5555, 760 01 Zlín, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Polymers 2019, 11(12), 1951; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11121951
Received: 3 November 2019 / Revised: 21 November 2019 / Accepted: 25 November 2019 / Published: 27 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Biointerfaces)
Caseinate-stabilized emulsions of black cumin (Nigella sativa) and tamanu (Calophyllum inophyllum) oils were studied in terms of preparation, characterization, and antibacterial properties. The oils were described while using their basic characteristics, including fatty acid composition and scavenging activity. The oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions containing the studied oils were formulated, and the influence of protein stabilizer (sodium caseinate (CAS), 1–12 wt%), oil contents (5–30 wt%), and emulsification methods (high-shear homogenization vs sonication) on the emulsion properties were investigated. It was observed that, under both preparation methods, emulsions of small, initial droplet sizes were predominantly formed with CAS content that was higher than 7.5 wt%. Sonication was a more efficient emulsification procedure and was afforded emulsions with smaller droplet size throughout the entire used concentration ranges of oils and CAS when compared to high-shear homogenization. At native pH of ~ 6.5, all of the emulsions exhibited negative zeta potential that originated from the presence of caseinate. The antibacterial activities of both oils and their emulsions were investigated with respect to the growth suppression of common spoilage bacteria while using the disk diffusion method. The oils and selected emulsions were proven to act against gram positive strains, mainly against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Bacillus cereus (B. cereus); regrettably, the gram negative species were fully resistant against their action.
Keywords: black cumin (Nigella sativa) seed oil; tamanu (Calophyllum inophyllum) seed oil; emulsion; formulation; antibacterial activity black cumin (Nigella sativa) seed oil; tamanu (Calophyllum inophyllum) seed oil; emulsion; formulation; antibacterial activity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Urbánková, L.; Kašpárková, V.; Egner, P.; Rudolf, O.; Korábková, E. Caseinate-Stabilized Emulsions of Black Cumin and Tamanu Oils: Preparation, Characterization and Antibacterial Activity. Polymers 2019, 11, 1951.

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