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Open AccessReview

Animal, Plant, Collagen and Blended Dietary Proteins: Effects on Musculoskeletal Outcomes

1
Department of Sport and Health Sciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX1 2LU, UK
2
Living Systems Institute, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD, UK
3
MRC Versus Arthritis Centre for Musculoskeletal Ageing Research and NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, University of Nottingham, Royal Derby Hospital Centre, Derby DE22 3DT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally.
Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2670; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092670
Received: 27 July 2020 / Revised: 26 August 2020 / Accepted: 29 August 2020 / Published: 1 September 2020
Dietary protein is critical for the maintenance of musculoskeletal health, where appropriate intake (i.e., source, dose, timing) can mitigate declines in muscle and bone mass and/or function. Animal-derived protein is a potent anabolic source due to rapid digestion and absorption kinetics stimulating robust increases in muscle protein synthesis and promoting bone accretion and maintenance. However, global concerns surrounding environmental sustainability has led to an increasing interest in plant- and collagen-derived protein as alternative or adjunct dietary sources. This is despite the lower anabolic profile of plant and collagen protein due to the inferior essential amino acid profile (e.g., lower leucine content) and subordinate digestibility (versus animal). This review evaluates the efficacy of animal-, plant- and collagen-derived proteins in isolation, and as protein blends, for augmenting muscle and bone metabolism and health in the context of ageing, exercise and energy restriction. View Full-Text
Keywords: animal-derived protein; plant-derived protein; collagen-derived protein; protein blends; skeletal muscle; bone; ageing; exercise; energy restriction animal-derived protein; plant-derived protein; collagen-derived protein; protein blends; skeletal muscle; bone; ageing; exercise; energy restriction
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MDPI and ACS Style

Deane, C.S; Bass, J.J; Crossland, H.; Phillips, B.E; Atherton, P.J. Animal, Plant, Collagen and Blended Dietary Proteins: Effects on Musculoskeletal Outcomes. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2670. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092670

AMA Style

Deane CS, Bass JJ, Crossland H, Phillips BE, Atherton PJ. Animal, Plant, Collagen and Blended Dietary Proteins: Effects on Musculoskeletal Outcomes. Nutrients. 2020; 12(9):2670. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092670

Chicago/Turabian Style

Deane, Colleen S; Bass, Joseph J; Crossland, Hannah; Phillips, Bethan E; Atherton, Philip J 2020. "Animal, Plant, Collagen and Blended Dietary Proteins: Effects on Musculoskeletal Outcomes" Nutrients 12, no. 9: 2670. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092670

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