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Open AccessArticle

Evaluation of the Prebiotic Potential of a Commercial Synbiotic Food Ingredient on Gut Microbiota in an Ex Vivo Model of the Human Colon

1
School of Nutrition Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada
2
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516, Egypt
3
Uplift Food Pty Ltd., New York, NY 10001, USA
4
School of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2669; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092669
Received: 28 July 2020 / Revised: 19 August 2020 / Accepted: 28 August 2020 / Published: 1 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Prebiotics and Probiotics)
Behavior and mood disorders have been linked to gut microbiota dysbiosis through the “microbiota-gut-brain axis”. Microbiota-targeting interventions are promising therapeutic modalities to restore or even maintain normal microbiome composition and activity in these disorders. Here, we test the impact of a commercial synbiotic formulation on gut microbiota composition and metabolic activity. We employed an ex-vivo continuous fermentation model that simulates the proximal colon to assess the effect of this formulation on microbiota structure and functionality as compared to no treatment control and microcrystalline cellulose as a dietary fiber control. The test formulation did not alter the diversity of gut microbiota over 48 h of treatment. However, it induced the enrichment of Lactobacillus, Collinsella and Erysipelotrichaceae. The test formulation significantly increased the level of microbiota-generated butyrate within 12 h of treatment as compared to 24 h required by microcrystalline cellulose to boost its production. The test formulation did not lead to a significant change in amino acid profiles. These results provide evidence of potential benefits related to synbiotic effects and general gut health and support the potential of this food formulation as a therapeutic dietary intervention in mood and behavior disorders. View Full-Text
Keywords: gut microbiota; prebiotics; synbiotics; psycho-biotics; microbiota-gut-brain axis gut microbiota; prebiotics; synbiotics; psycho-biotics; microbiota-gut-brain axis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mottawea, W.; Sultan, S.; Landau, K.; Bordenave, N.; Hammami, R. Evaluation of the Prebiotic Potential of a Commercial Synbiotic Food Ingredient on Gut Microbiota in an Ex Vivo Model of the Human Colon. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2669. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092669

AMA Style

Mottawea W, Sultan S, Landau K, Bordenave N, Hammami R. Evaluation of the Prebiotic Potential of a Commercial Synbiotic Food Ingredient on Gut Microbiota in an Ex Vivo Model of the Human Colon. Nutrients. 2020; 12(9):2669. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092669

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mottawea, Walid; Sultan, Salma; Landau, Kara; Bordenave, Nicolas; Hammami, Riadh. 2020. "Evaluation of the Prebiotic Potential of a Commercial Synbiotic Food Ingredient on Gut Microbiota in an Ex Vivo Model of the Human Colon" Nutrients 12, no. 9: 2669. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092669

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